01/30/20 Readers’ Advisory Meets Collection Development

01/30/20 Readers’ Advisory Meets Collection Development


Beckwith: Good morning,
everyone. I’m LeAnn Beckwith, SWFLN’s continuing education
coordinator, and I would like to welcome you
all to today’s webinar, “Readers’ Advisory Meets
Collection Development,” and to today’s presenter,
Dr. Stephanie Rollins. Dr. Rollins is a research and writing specialist
at the Air University Press at Maxwell
Air Force Base. She is also an adjunct professor
for The University of Alabama, and teaches
digital reference, collection development
and organization of information, among other courses. Stephanie serves on
both regional and state
library committees, and she has 23 years
of experience in academic
and special libraries. She holds a BA in English
from Auburn University, a master’s degree
in Library Service and a doctorate
in Public Administration both from
The University of Alabama. Please help me welcome
Stephanie and enjoy her webinar. Rollins: Good morning, everyone. Thank you so much
for being here today. So today we get to talk about
and look at two of my favorite parts
of being a librarian, which is readers’ advisory
and collection development. Reference
is also thrown in there too, but those are some of my
favorite things to talk about, to read about,
to teach people about. So today, what we’re going to
look at is kind of this idea that readers’ advisory and collection development
play off of each other, and you really, I don’t believe,
can have one without the other. They both inform each other. Your readers’ advisory
is going to influence how you develop your collection
and the things that you buy and the things that you manage
in your collection. Conversely, or at the same time, your collection
development policy can sometimes drive your
readers’ advisory practices, the things that you buy, the things that you put
in your collection. So ideally we’re kind of looking
for this sweet spot in between where collection
development kind of meets up with readers’ advisory
with the ultimate goal being that you meet
what your patrons and your community needs. They’re able to improve
their literacy, get the materials
that they need. They’re happy, and they want to
come back to the library whether it’s in person
or online. Whatever it might be,
that’s a true sign of success. So that’s a little bit about
what we’re going to look at today,
so this is just kind of a teaser slide for you. So on the agenda, of course, to talk about
collection development. I’m going to do a little bit
of an introduction, and if you’ve had some
experience with collection development
it might be a review for you. Key to this is getting
to know your community, you know, in terms
of readers’ advisory, in terms of
collection development. It’s very important, and we’ll
talk a little bit about that. I have a takeaway activity
for you if there’s something
about this that you would like to look
at your community and kind of get to know
your community again. It could have changed recently. There’s some ways to do that. We’re also going to look
at talking about collection
development policies and things that need to be
in there, very quickly. We’ll also talk about kind of
managing your collection a little bit and tidying up because you can’t have
new things if your shelves are overflowing, and that speaks
to readers’ advisory and your collection
development policy as well. We’ll talk about: why readers’
advisory, what it is,
the reference interview because that plays
into readers’ advisory. We’re also going to talk
about the reference interview versus readers’
advisory. Is it the same?
Is it different? We’ll talk a little bit
about that. A little bit of jargon. Of course, librarians,
we love our terminology. There’s a couple of terms associated with
what all this is, and we’ll kind of cover
that as we go. Where to begin
with readers’ advisory. We’ll talk a little bit
about that. Some traditional
and non-traditional resources. I always look to give you
free stuff because a lot of libraries, like mine,
don’t have a ton of money, and how can you
do readers’ advisory, empower your patrons
to do it themselves, or, you know, how can you
do things for free? How can you also, as a reader,
find things for free to help you with your own
personal readers’ advisory? And then another takeaway
activity that you guys can do as far as role-playing
in your library, and then — So to get started,
we’re going to talk, again, like I said, focus a little bit
on collection development. So collection development
to me — Whenever I think about
collection development, you know, it’s so library and
even branch library specific, type of library specific. It’s kind of looking into
this great wide-open and, you know, it’s kind of — Sometimes I feel like a rebel
without a clue. But I think if, as we talk
about collection development and go through
some of the processes, some of the terms,
some of the things that you need to think about,
it becomes a lot more clear because you are going to
look at your community. You’re going to look
at your collection, and you’re going to make
this more clear. But it really does depend on
your specific library and your patrons
and your community. So just some basic terms. What is a collection?
We all know this, but it’s really everything
that you have in your library: all formats, all genres,
all types of information that you either purchase
or you lease. And to me, there’s kind of
a little bit of a difference between collection development
and collection management. So, for me,
collection development is kind of, you know,
you develop your collection. You build it, and you look
at your community and your user needs. Things like how you select, what your budget is,
how you do outreach. And also includes things
like how you negotiate your contracts for databases, and also work with state
partnerships like SWFLN. So collection management to me
is more about kind of leading, what you decide to cancel, preservation,
different things like that. So when we talk about collection
management, that’s a little bit later, but it’s also very important
to readers’ advisory as well. But the entire goal of this
whole collection development and collection management
is really to meet the needs of your users
and your library mission. So your turn if you have
a second and you feel inclined. Why do you think we should focus
on collection development? I’m going to tell you
why I think so, but why do you think we should? And go ahead and type
in the chat window, and I’ll give you
just a couple seconds. George is typing. Fantastic. Exactly. And I think, George,
you must have read my slide. Yes, information
is always changing. Absolutely, Colleen.
It’s exciting. I mean, you get to change
how people use the library and what they need
and meeting a challenge. Yes, bringing the community
what they want and need. Fantastic. So this is kind of a busy image, but to me collection development
, collection management, the budgets, cooperative
collection development, your marketing,
all of that really centers around the users,
your community. You guys are exactly
on the same page with me. So all theses collection
management and collection development functions center
around our love for our users, for our community,
for our patrons. So fantastic.
Thank you for sharing. And again, like you guys said,
collection development is really an opportunity
to make sense of it all. I mean, there’s changes
everywhere: the technology, our economy has,
you know, had a recession. We’ve come back a little. People are nervous, right? And it’s important to be able
to think through these issues and make informed decisions. So this is what it used
to look like, probably back in the ’80s, ’90s. You know, things would
get published. It would be sent to the vendor.
The library would buy it, and then the patrons
would get it, right? Very simple. This is kind of what
it looks like today, and there may be more layers
on top of this that I haven’t added. So you can, you know — You have
a traditional publisher. People are self-publishing. There’s software. There’s also institutional
repositories, so it gets a little bit murky and cloudy
in trying to figure out. So collection development
is a way to kind of manage that. So what are some of the things
that we do with collection development
and management? To me, and some of these
I’ve highlighted in terms of readers’ advisory
that I think are important — They’re all important. But really for me
readers’ advisory comes down to knowing your community
and selecting materials that are going to meet
their needs. It’s also about managing
the collection and making sure
that you’ve got what you need, and you don’t have extra things,
you know, within reason. There’s reasons for
keeping things sometimes that aren’t apparent. But it’s also, you know,
planning and writing policies so you have that written down
and you can refer back to that. It’s about marketing, and it’s also about
evaluating what you have. And then, you know,
there’s a little bit of liaison and outreach
trying to get to our people. So some of the — Again,
some of the tasks, you know, are selecting and budgeting,
communicating and reporting, and it varies depending
on your library. When I worked for an academic
library, I mean, I selected,
but I wasn’t responsible for the entire collection
development policies. So depending on where you are
your functions may be different, the size of your library
and the type of your library. If you need help there’s a lot
of ALA groups and LISTSERVs and web pages that can definitely
help you with that. So similar to my really simple
image with the readers’ advisory
and collection development, this just kind of shows you
some of the influences, some of the outside influences. So, you know, we’ve got change. We’ve got our current situation. On one side we’ve got
the collection, and on the other side
we’ve got the user with their community needs,
and they have use patterns and demand
that they’re trying to meet. Why they want what they want. And our side we have our goals
and objectives which includes
our selection policies and our existing collection. So there’s kind of different
forces at work, and we’re trying to meet
all of that. So what are some of the steps
in developing a collection? You want to examine
your local community thoroughly. And I’ve got an activity later
if you’d like to do that. It’s very simple. You want to study the users
and their interests, right? Have a group that does
readers’ advisory or collection development. Talk to each other. You know, make a note of what
is getting the most requests. You want to write a collection
development policy that defines the library’s goals
and objectives. You want to assess
your current collection. It’s very important periodically
to do that to see if you’re still meeting
the needs of your user profile. You know, also writing
collection statements. You know, of course,
creating a long-term plan are very important. You also need to look
at your budget which is often the
hardest part, right? You have all these ideas, and then you have
to look at your budget and what’s going
to be purchased. And you also look
at your reading guidelines. What do you want
to keep and why? So again, why do we want to know
our community? And you guys have hit the nail
on the head. We want to think about
our collection development and our, again,
our readers’ advisory tactics and things that we’re
going to do. We want to create newer modified
services, maybe change service points and maybe look at our
physical facilities as well. Again you can look at
the attitudes of your community about your services
and collections. You can predict if you’re going
to need more staff. And you can also — It will inform
your budgeting process. So how can you get to know
your community? So I’ve got some different
things I’m going to talk to you about, and this speaks
to readers’ advisory but also collection development, so I think it’s
very helpful for both. So our assessment should focus
on information that relates to the collection, and our collection is
really based on our users and our patrons. So some of the things to look at
are, you know, who is in our local community, the size of the various age
groups, levels of education and income
and the areas of interest. And I’m saying all this. It’s not a perfect science,
collection development, looking at your user,
readers’ advisory, but there’s ways
you can help yourself. And so that’s what I’m trying
to do today is kind of help you get some ideas of ways you can look
at both of those topics and see what you can do
to get better at it or, you know,
to maybe help your library get the things you feel
like you have a gap and you’re not meeting
exactly what your users need. Well how — What can you look
at to kind of meet that gap? Again look at the local
community library needs, and then indicate what materials
are going to meet that goal. So what kind of information
is studied? You can look at historical data. You know, libraries
usually keep that. They usually do user studies,
surveys, different things like that. You can look at geographical
information. Who is in your community?
How far away are they? How hard is it for them
to get to your library? And again, think
about electronic. It doesn’t necessarily matter
if they just use your Libby
and download books, right, but that’s also
good information to know. Do they have to take a bus? Is it a biking community? Those are things
that help you kind of look at collection development,
believe it or not. Basic demographic data, age,
gender, you know, how many kids
are in the area, economic data. What is their funding level? Are they going to be interested
in things on finance for instance. It’s a huge business community, and you just don’t know
until you look. You know,
what kind of communications systems are they using? Are they a lot of large print
readers, or do they like
their things on an iPad? Do they only contact you online? That’s good information to know. What kind of cultural and
recreational organizations are in the area that you could
partner with and if there’s any other community
information services around. So how can you know
your community? And these are some questions
you can ask. So who are your users? What are their interests? What are their likes
and dislikes, and then what motivates them
to keep coming back, either setting foot in the
library or visiting you online? So those are questions that a lot of this data
can help you answer. Again, it’s not precise,
but it does give you some clues. So there’s some methods
you can look at. You can hire a consultant. There’s a couple of links here
if you want to look at that. You can pay for
GIS data analysis. There is a great article
in Library Journal that covers a couple
of different resources that do that. I didn’t include
those slides here, but if you want to go look
at that, they do some fantastic work, and they tie it
to your collection. I mean, there’s all kinds of
really neat things they can do, but it comes at a cost. So that’s just something
to consider. For me, you know,
I’m going to advocate for free if you can do it. But there’s things
you can do in-house. You can conduct
community surveys, hold small group discussions,
one-on-one interviews. You know, just when somebody
is there say, “Hey, what did you like
about this book?” or, “What do you like
about the library?” Just, you know, engage people in
conversation. It doesn’t have to be — Again you can also, like I said,
get things from free — available data from free sites,
and you can also compare that to interlibrary loaning
and circulation statistics. Those will also give you a ton
of information that will help you
with readers’ advisory because if you look
at Interlibrary loan and you don’t have those
free sources, it will spot gaps. And then CircStats. You could see
what’s circulating the most. That will give you
some information. Use the information
you already have at hand. So this is just an example
of a sample community survey that I picked up, something
really simple you can do. You can also do a focus group, which is a little bit
more intense. Sometimes you have to offer,
you know, like, a Starbucks card or something
or, you know, library swag, but again it can give you
a lot more detailed information. And then some of the free
stats you can gather — It’s very simple to do so. You can get information
on population, housing, religion, health. You know, health is important
because sometimes you might need to add information
to your library that you weren’t
even aware of. Like, maybe people
in your community have — You know, want to quit smoking or they have
cardiovascular disease, and a lot of the free sources that I’m going to show you
will give you that information. Some of it’s based
on the Census. Some of it’s based
on other sources, but it’s just helpful
to know them. It speaks to your collection and also when you’re trying
to do readers’ advisory. Again income, gender, age,
education. What’s their family status? Are you in an area that has
a ton of kids or no kids? I mean, that’s good to know. What race, ethnicity? Do you need to have
other-language-type materials in your library? Are there people with disability
in your area? Sometimes they need help
with that. Also veterans, you know, is it a retirement community
for the military? And then what types of industry
are in your area? So that seems like a lot
of information, right? But there’s some sources here. Two of my — These are
some of my favorite ones. Actually all of them
are really great. The second one, the Association
of Religion Data Archives, sounds interesting. Like, why would you get —
How would you get information from a religion archive? But it’s fantastic. The American FactFinder,
which is of course the census. Again the Community Health Needs Assessment
is focused on health, but it also includes
a ton of information. It will actually help you get an
entire report on the community. And of course, your own Florida
Electronic Library that you have access to. There’s a Demographics Now database that you
can look at for Florida. So once you get your data
it’s all great fun. Run the data.
You got all those statistics, but you have to kind of
determine, you know, what’s important. What are they key findings? And so you want to find
information that validates the community’s
needs and assets. What, you know, are you —
What you find in the community, is that what you find
in your collection? You know, look at the trends
in the data. Look at different segments
across the community. And it also helps you
clarify answers to the community’s assessments
key questions, those questions we asked about. What do they need?
Why do they come back? Different things like that. And so again, they should point
to an asset or need of the population
of your community. Some things will just pop out
really quickly. Some of them are more, you know,
kind of an inference-type thing, but you just need
to look at the data. And it may be related
to several categories: health, age, religion. Those may all kind of
interact together. So again, use that information
to document your kind of priorities
for your collection and for readers’ advisories. Like I said, tie these stats
to your library usage data, your Interlibrary
Loan, your circulation, your foot traffic. Also, you know, I love data. But I, you know —
You can hire somebody or have a college student look at the data
and kind of crunch it to make it —
crunch it, you know. Make it so it’s a little bit
more meaningful. And then what — A lot
of people are visual, right? So if you use charts and graphs sometimes that gives you
more information, and it’s easier
to kind of see things like that. So after you interpret the data
or as you interpret the data you want to ask questions. You know, what are
the most important needs, and what needs are most relevant to the mission and experience
of the library? And then how do we reconcile
these conflicting needs? And then, you know, again,
what are realistic expectations because you can run this data. You can spot trends, but then your budget
may not support that. So what are the realistic
expectations for resources to respond to these needs? And again reporting.
Like I said, people are visual. So this is, you know, do you use
the library first for a specific even or book or item? 65%. Browsing materials either online
or at a location to find something new,
unexpected. 34%, so that’s interesting
information. So again if you display
your data in charts and graphs, it’s fantastic. And then what that helps you do
is kind of you can — You don’t have to put this
in your collection development policy,
but it gives you, as a librarian,
as the administrator, kind of a profile
of your community, and it’s just very helpful
to look at things like that when you’re thinking
about your collection or doing readers’ advisory. So this is an activity,
and at the end I’ll put in all the links
and the links to the two activities
in the chat box, so you don’t have to worry
about getting this down. But it’s kind of a way to kind
of run through some of the stats on looking at your community, and it’s just
an exercise for you. Okay. So also important
to readers’ advisory and collection development
is to have an existing policy. And if you haven’t looked
at yours in a while, do that. It’s a way to kind of
ensure stability, to look at the historical memory
of things you’ve done before. It’s great for training for new
people, to let them know, “Hey, this is what we focus on
in our collection,” and it will also speak
to readers’ advisory because, you know, you’ll know
that if you find something for a reader, this may
or may not fit our collection. It talks about the different
procedures, you know, ordering,
different things like that. It informs your customers,
and it also informs your staff. And it can often sometimes
protect you as well, which is censorship,
different things like that, or just, you know, “Hey,
we’re going to have this book because we are into promoting
the freedom to read.” It’s going to protect your
collection development policy, so you need to make sure
that you have one and that you’ve looked
at it recently. It also speaks to priorities. What are you going to put
in your collection? And again that speaks
to your community. It also talks about standards. Sometimes it will talk
about budgets. Sometimes it will give
a performance assessment and talk about, you know,
“We did this much work, and we ordered
this many things.” Again sometimes it will be
an environmental scan, which is again, looking at
your community and that data. Sometimes it can be used
for accountability. And then it’s a great
public relations tool. It kind of speaks
to what your library does, and a lot of times people don’t
understand what libraries do. And so a collection about
the policy is great for that. So who does them? It just really depends
on your library. It could be a committee.
It could be a director. It could be your board. It could be your head
of collection development. All different kinds of people
do it in different ways
in all different libraries. So this is just real quick. I’m not going to go through
all of them. But I have seen, you know,
like 100-page collection development policies,
and then I’ve seen two-page. So again it depends
on your library and what you’re going to do. But, you know, usually they talk
about the purpose, a little bit of background
on the library, who’s responsible for what,
the goals, your audience, the budget. If you do things where you get
things on demand, which is a fantastic thing
if you can do it. Where patrons actually put in
a request for what they want. It can be expensive. Sometimes it will talk
about copyright, selection aids, if there’s
a cooperative agreement. And then again, acquisitions, how you guys handle gifts
and exchanges, how you handle challenges
to books. So this is just some of
the things that are in a collection
development policy that you may want
to be aware of. And again, that speaks
to readers’ advisory because you’ll know what you
need to do to help them, and also, you know, what is
allowed by your collection. Okay. So just really quickly talk
about collection management. So these are, again,
the decisions that happen after you get an item. It’s important because
of the condition of books, also your budget, space,
and again, like we talked about
in the beginning, shifts in the users, shifts in what
the community wants. And so it can be weeding. It can be preservation
or conservation. If you have a special
collection area, it can speak to subscription
renewal, cancellation or just getting
something electronic. And it’s also about protecting
your collection. And a lot of times this can be a really emotional
and political issue. So you need to have something in your collection
development policy, and you need to make sure
everybody knows what it is. So to me, one of the most
important parts about managing collections
is weeding. and I don’t feel like — It’s so hard because we’ve paid
money for these books, but you have to ask yourself, “Is it meeting the needs
of what the community needs and information changes?” So there’s all kinds of
different words for weeding. It’s, you know — Basically it’s taking stuff
out of the collection, and you do it because space
is an issue or the quality, or it’s not useful anymore,
or it’s not current. You know, if you have — I mean, from a historical
standpoint, you know, an atlas that still
has the USSR on it might be helpful
historically, but you really want
an up-to-date atlas. So, you know, maybe you get rid
of some of the historical atlases and keep, you know,
focus on more of the new ones. So it’s just — Again it just
depends on your library and what that atlas is. Maybe it’s an invaluable atlas, and it needs to go
in your special collections. Again it’s not
a precise science. But communication is crucial. Again there is some criteria with weeding,
you know, the condition. Is it used?
Is it outdated? And then sometimes
you keep things because there is no other source in the community
for these resources. They may be
a little bit outdated. It may be something
that’s a special collection or something that was donated. So sometimes, you know, the rules don’t
always apply to collections. Wait just a second.
I lost my screen there. Sorry about that.
Okay. So some of the ways
you can do weeding, and I’m not going to go
through these in depth, but probably one of my favorites
is the MUSTIE, which means you look
at the information. Is it misleading? Is it ugly, meaning the book
is falling apart, and it can’t be repaired. Is it superseded, meaning
something new has come out. Is it trivial? Can you get it elsewhere? You know, a lot of our reference
materials now are free online. Or your collection
doesn’t have a need for it. You know, it’s a book on rocket
science, and you’re — It’s just not your library. You know, that’s not
a really great example, but you get my point. And then one of the things
I thought about too is there’s all this stuff
about Marie Kondo. And there’s — And again,
like I said in the beginning, there’s other considerations
to think about too. But she says, you know,
“Tidy all at once. Visualize the destination. Determine if
the item sparks joy. And tidy by category,
not location. And tidy in order.” So I just think about how that might apply
to collection development. It may or may not be helpful. So there’s different ways
you can do your weeding. You can do shelf reading. Title-by-title review. Sometimes your library system
can run a report. There’s all kinds of services you can pay for that will look
at your services, or you can decide to do call
number ranges by year. This is just a form that was
in one of my collection development
books that I taught with, and I kind of edited it
a little bit. And it just kind of covers a bunch of the different
methods at once. You’ll get a copy of the slide, so if it’s something that would
be helpful for you, great. Please use it. And again,
you can make a schedule. Think about what, you know, what areas
that you want to weed. Okay.
So readers’ advisory. We talked a lot about
collection development, and we’re about halfway through. So readers’ advisory. Again, let me just type
in the chat box. Your answers might be
very similar to the things that you typed in
for collection development, but why do we do readers’
advisory? Why is it important? Yes.
Absolutely, Grace B. She typed, in all caps,
“TO HELP THE PATRONS.” Fantastic.
Yes. If you look at this word cloud, you see readers
is the biggest word, right? And it — You know,
it’s helpful. Patrons, reading, literacy. You know, getting people to read
is just so very important. And what do we want
to accomplish? Again, we want people to read. We want people to be literate. We want to expose them
to new ideas and new authors and fun, right?
Yeah. Absolutely, George,
and fine-tune the search parameters.
Absolutely. You know, I want a book
about war. Okay, well, which war? You know, do you want people? Do you want the technology? Exactly.
Fantastic. Yes. So there’s no pressure here.
I promise. You’re not going to
be expected — You know, when I first thought
about readers’ advisory, I was like, “Oh, I have to know
every single book in the world,” which is kind of a naive thing,
you know, when I first started. But I didn’t know. You don’t have to know
every title or author or genre on the planet, but you do,
as George pointed out, need to fine-tune
the search parameters. And that’s what, if you’re
excellent at readers’ advisory, you know how to do,
and you know which tools to use. You don’t have to read
every book on the planet. You don’t have to write
a review or annotation or start a blog or take a quiz
or change your style. You don’t have to do any of
those things, so there’s no pressure. This should be fun. To me this is fun and exciting,
and I love talking about books. So really, what is
readers’ advisory? We’re finding the books that
readers want to read and why. Why do they want to read
these books? Why do they want to read
a certain book or a genre? And it’s about having
an open mind, positive attitude,
being responsive, committing to serving the reader
and enjoying the conversation. Like I said, this should be fun. So a little bit of jargon. So really readers’ advisory
is simply talking about books. You’ll see the word “appeal,” and those are things
about the books that appeals to the reader,
why they enjoy the book. And we’ll talk a little bit
more about that. A genre, which is any sizable
group of fiction authors and/or titles that have similar
characteristics and appeal. They’re also written to
a particular specific pattern. When I think about that,
I think about time travel books or romance. A lot of — or mystery. There are some variations,
and that — Sometimes that will fall to
in what’s called a subgenre because there could be
a horror time travel, right? So it’s just kind of, you know, how the book falls
into somewhat of a subject area. So within readers’ advisory, there is a bit of the reference
interview. So I’m just going to talk
very quickly about that. I’ve had, you know, a whole day
spent on the reference interview and role-playing and stuff, so I’m just going to
talk through this quickly. But what is the reference
interview? And this is an old,
old definition that I think still holds true regardless of the medium
that you do it in. But it’s that interpersonal
communication between you
and a library user, and you’re trying to determine
specific information needs, which might be different
from what they started with. It can — Like I said,
in-person, telephone, e-mail, chat,
Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat. Whatever it might be,
it can happen. And it’s —
If you’re good at this, you know, a lot of times
the person might be hesitant, but you can
help them through that. So one of the things
that spoke to me, and I call this my reference
interview Zen, is the four Rs
of the reference interview. And they don’t really teach,
you know, writing cursive in schools
anymore, at least not here. But, you know, you’ve heard
about the three Rs: reading, writing and arithmetic. And so Tyckoson developed
this set of four Rs for the reference interview,
and it kind of reminds me of “The Karate Kid” movie. I’ve used this analogy
a million times, so if you’ve heard this before
just kind of breeze on by. But it’s kind of like you —
It’s a cycle. It’s kind of a Zen that helps
you, and it’s really simple. And if you follow the steps, you’re more likely to have
your patrons come back whether it’s in-person
or online. So these are the four Rs,
and I’ll talk through them, again like I said, quickly. But you want to reassure
the patron. You want to respond. You want to reflect.
Then you want to repeat. So that’s just very quickly. And so you do this
as many times as needed. So the first thing you want
to do is reassure, and I’ve got a lot of text here, but when you get
a copy of the slides this will be something
that you can come back and look at should you need to. So reassuring is to make
the person feel welcome whether it’s online,
whether it’s in chat. You want — You know,
it’s not a pep talk, but you want to give them
that encouragement that they’re in the right place. That you can help them. That, yes, I’m sure we can find
something on that. Those are all ways to reassure
them. You want to respond.
So once you say, “Hey, yeah. I can help you,”
you want to give them help. But again,
a lot of our customers don’t ask for what they want. So you need to ask open-ended
questions and closed-ended questions to kind of get to
what they’re looking for, and sometimes this takes
a lot of time. But it’s also going to not waste
your time or the customer’s time if you do
a great reference interview. So how do you ask?
So you want to begin a dialogue. Again, they don’t ask
for what they want. They just don’t know. So what you want to do is,
for instance, if somebody asks about
where the magazines are when they really want
to find research articles on genetic engineering. If you just ask
for the magazines, she may not know that’s her full question,
but she asked her that. And if somebody just sends them,
“Okay. Here is the magazines,” which we wouldn’t do that
because we know better, but that really is not
answering the right question. So open-ended questions,
just in case you didn’t know because I always have
people say, “Well, what is
an open-ended question?” Well, it’s where you want to get
a response other than yes or no. So it’s things like,
“Where have you looked so far? Tell me more about that.” You know, it’s not a yes
or not answer, and you can alternate this
with closed-ended questions to kind of narrow things down. So closed-ended questions. “Where have you looked?” I’m sorry.
That’s in open-ended questions. “Do you want books or articles?” It’s, you know, yes or no,
A or B. “Do you want current
or historical informations?” And then near the end
a closed-ended question is, “Do you feel like you
have what you need?” So you can kind of close
your reference interview. So those are what closed-ended
questions are. And you want to be careful
how you ask questions. There’s neutral questions
and then non-neutral questions. Like, “What do you
need that for?” You know, saying that out loud
does not sound as good as, “Well, how do you plan
to use that information?” You want to make sure
that you’re kind of neutral in the way that you ask things, and that’s sometimes
really hard to do. Okay, so once you think you know
what the customer wants you want
to state it back to them. And it doesn’t have to be
exactly what they said, but, you know, something like, “So if I understand
you correctly, you’re looking for books
by John Sanford that mention the Caribbean.” You know, you just
kind of summarize. And then they may come back
and give you more details. And then, like I said,
you may repeat the process depending on what you have to do and the information
that you get with the patron. And again, this is independent
of any kind of medium. So how is it different
than readers’ advisory? In both your goal is to identify
what the person wants, right? Both use open-ended questioning
and closed-ended questioning to kind of get what they need. Again, you’re going to look
at print. You may look at online. You may look at local resources. Are available to support
both kinds of interactions. But unlike the readers’
advisory inquiry with its range
of potential responses, usually a reference interview is more of a specific answer,
right? Research articles on genetics. That’s pretty specific, right? A customer seeking reference
help often has an understanding of kind of the direction
they want to go, right? And they may not know exactly because they haven’t
ready anything yet. A reader, on the other hand,
is a situation that does not — They don’t typically know
what they want, right? They don’t know exactly
what they want and the possible reading paths
that are available, and they may not even know
how to say what they like. So unique to readers’ advisory is a discussion of a reader’s
experience with the book, and you don’t always
get that with reference — just the basic reference
interaction. So and also,
staff-identified factors that appeal to the reader and translates them
into a range of suggestions. So where do you start
with readers’ advisory? Some things to remember. You want to remember
the First Amendment, which we’re all fantastic at,
but it bears repeating. Be a great listener. Again, practice the four Rs
that we just talked about. Part of that is asking
open-ended questions. We want to offer suggestions. You want to close and follow up. That’s very important
to the reference interview and also to readers’ advisory. Important to this is to learn
about your own reading style. That’s the fun part, right? You want to talk.
You want to join in. Pay attention, and you can
get help from other resources. And finally, have no fear. So we’re going to talk a little
bit about each one of these. So the First Amendment. Even if you don’t like
the questions your customer is asked about,
it makes you — Not uncomfortable,
but, you know, it’s not the things
that you like to read, right? Keep an open mind, and people
have the right to disagree. That’s the whole fabulous part
about being a librarian is that we can provide
information to people so they can disagree. You want to become
a better listener. Sometimes it’s really hard
to not finish people’s sentences while they’re talking, right? So be a better listener. Take a moment. Think about what questions
you could ask the person. Also what does the reader
talk about when they’re talking about books and they’re talking about
what they want to find next? What is the setting, the pace,
the atmosphere? What about the characters? And then I call this
“The Feels.” How does it make them feel? You know, anxious, excited. Are there lessons learned? And often, not always,
but a lot of times as you start talking to somebody
in the readers’ advisory process they’ll tell you
exactly what they like. So what to listen for:
a descriptions of pacing. So this is things like
it’s a page-turner. It’s gripping.
It’s fast. It has lots of action. It’s very descriptive. It’s got a detailed description. There’s a lot of research,
or there’s no research. There’s descriptions
of the story. It’s violent, gentle. It’s family-centered. It’s tragic.
It’s inspirational. It’s racy. It’s spooky,
or it’s thought-provoking. Descriptions of the atmosphere. It’s bleak. It’s suspenseful, my favorite. It’s upbeat.
It’s humorous. It’s magical.
It’s romantic. And some of the other
descriptions have to do with the cast and characters. You know, he was a [bleep]
Excuse me. I probably shouldn’t say
that word. You know, things like that. People will actually say
that in readers’ advisory. I didn’t say that. The story line, the length of
the book and the writing style. You know, I think about Faulkner and how he wrote is
completely different than anything
I had ever read, right? So those are other descriptions
to listen for. And again, like we talked
about earlier, ask open-ended questions, and these are specific
to readers’ advisory. You know, tell me about a book
or film or audio recording that you’ve enjoyed. Tell me about what you enjoyed
about this book. Who is your favorite author? What are three of your
favorite authors? Tell me why you like this book
or author, or can you tell me
more about? And if you have a second
in the chat window, type some questions
that you’ve asked. This will only help each other
with this, if you have any other questions
that you’ve asked that you thought were pretty
effective in readers’ advisory. So I’ll give you a second
to do that. Or do these pretty much
cover it? You can just say,
“Yep, covered.” So, Sara is typing.
Wait a second. Sara and Colleen. Multiple
attendees are typing. That’s always a good sign. Thank you. So I’m going to go to
the next slide while I’m waiting
for that to come through. You know, we want to offer
suggestions, titles and authors that
they might be interested in. And you can use their feedback. Again, remember you’re going
to respond and then reflect, and they’ll tell you, and you may have to go
through this a couple times. Exactly. What length of material?
Yeah. Sometimes I’ve had people come
to the library and say, “I want this book on this,
but it can only — It has to be really short.” Right? Movies, too.
Absolutely. If the patron is more of a movie
visual person, they don’t read
a lot, absolutely. Fantastic. Again, like I said, you can use
their feedback to determine what they like. When you go to get the items
bring the customer with you. Now this is more in-person,
right? But you can also provide
a selection of books, but don’t give them
too many, you know? That sometimes that
overwhelm them, right? And be sure to let them know they don’t have to borrow
everything. They could always come back. You can always come back
and get more. Again, they’ll reject
some suggestions, and they need to feel
like they can do this. That’s totally fine. Again, they can leave books. Say, “Hey, leave whatever you
don’t like. I’ll reshelve it.” And again, give them time
to review the books in private so they don’t
have to explain to you why they like the books
or they don’t like the books. Again, you want to close
and follow up. You know, again,
this is in-person, but it can also be
through e-mail or chat or whatever it might be, but follow up after
they’ve had time to look
at some of the selections. You know, say, “Hey, did this
meet what you’re looking for? Am I on the right track
with you?” You know, again, no difference
if you’re doing a reference question. Make sure they’re satisfied, and tell them
you’re always available if they need more assistance. Again, you can look at results from electronic
and print research. We’re going to talk a little bit
about that in a minute, and provide
any other information you think they might need. Like, for instance,
a series of titles. There’s a character. These are all the books
with that character. And again, ask them
what they liked or did not like the next time
they visit or they visit your chat
or they send you an e-mail. And this will help you
help your other customers. Again, learn about
your reading style. To me this is the fun part,
and this also helps inform how you do readers’ advisory
with customers. You know, this about
the last word you read. What words pop into your head? And if you have a second,
type it in the chat box. What it is a place
or a time period? For me, I just picked up
this book called “The Tattooist of…”
I can never say this word. I apologize. …”Auschwitz.” And it talks about
the person who — I just started it. Who puts the tattoos
on the people arriving. So it’s a, you know —
It’s a specific place. It’s a specific time period. The book focuses on the person
who is doing that. I don’t know the name
because I just started it. You know, what are some of
the issues, topics, conflicts, lessons. I mean, this book is all over
the place with that. And the pace. You know, it starts off
really quick and emotions. I mean, obviously it’s got me
emotional thinking about what happened to
people during that time period, and it just being the 75th
anniversary of the Holocaust. So anyways, I mean,
all those things teaches me about my reading style
and only helps inform me when I’m trying
to do readers’ advisory. So if you have a second, you know, think about a book
you just read, and you can put the title
of the book in the chat box. And then, you know, it just
helps your awareness of why you read what you read, and again, it helps you
with readers’ advisory. Again, talk in.
Talk. Join in, and pay attention. Talk about books with friends
and family, which is really easy for us,
right, because — I always, you know,
at a party of something when somebody finds out
you’re a librarian, “Well, what books
are you reading? What would you recommend?” Right? Join a book
or a discussion group. Libraries are fantastic places,
but even personally do it. Always be familiar
with the best sellers, and then go to a book store
and just browse, and see what they have out
on their shelves. What are they trying
to get people to buy? And they usually do great
marketing, and they have reasons, right? They don’t put — Either they want
to sell something because they have a ton of it,
or it’s a huge seller and they want
to make more money. Again, but familiar with
your library offers readers, and again,
that speaks to your collection and knowing your collection. Also, subscribe to newsletters. There’s a ton of things
out there, and we’ll talk about
a couple of those in a second. So how can you do readers’
advisory? When we talk about readers’
advisory, a lot of the things that we talk
about or think about is face-to-face, right? But a lot of people
don’t necessarily come to your library,
and you’d find that out — You could find that out when
you look at your statistics. You know, how many people
are in your community, and then what’s
your foot traffic? So traditional methods
like face-to-face might work for you,
so that’s how you — one of the ways that we’re used
to doing readers’ advisory. This is the
Seattle Public Library, and they have
a reading suggestions desk. And they have done a ton
with readers’ advisory, and so I have a lot
of examples for them. You can have, you know,
displays and shelf lists. Like, if you like — I love this little card series
that they’ve done over here, and they also have displays
for people browsing, so you don’t necessarily
have to go up to the desk and ask somebody for help because not everybody
wants to do that. Sometimes they’re intimidated,
so this is a way, a passive kind of way,
to get people to get help. So there’s a lot
of traditional ways that you can do
readers’ advisory on behalf of the customer,
but you can also empower them and let them
search these databases. It doesn’t just have to be
librarian issued. So a couple of subscription
databases that are really helpful —
if you look — If you have Libby of interest
rate you have Overdrive, if you go into that
it’s very helpful because it will actually suggest
other books that are, you know, might be your next favorite
or similar to that topic. One of the things that I found when I was teaching
for Key West — I did a collection development
readers’ advisory, kind of a mash-up of eight or nine different
topics for them. A whole day professional
development. One of the things that a lot
of people that worked there did not know was their inside
their library catalog, of course you can click
on subjects, right? But they also had a link
that said “similar titles,” and what was fantastic
about that library system was that you could see
what was a similar title that was actually
in the catalog, so you didn’t have to go out
and see — go back out of the catalog
and then see if you actually had the item. So look at your library catalog
and make sure, and see if you have that option. Library
catalogs have come a long way. Also, library catalogs, a lot of times
you have a visual display, and it’ll show you books
that are next to each other. Sometimes
that’s helpful as well. Through the Florida
Electronic Library, you do have books
and author database, and so that’s something
you can look at. Your customers, you know,
in Florida can look at it, and it’s really nice. It can help you look
at your next great book. It’s got multiple searching
and browsing options, and it has visual results. Novelist, some libraries
have that as a subscription. It’s probably one of
my favorites that I used in library school
for assignments. You can really deep dive into it
and look at different genres. It’s more of a librarian thing, not that patrons
couldn’t use it, but it just speaks
more to us, I believe. Now Booklist.
We talked about a newsletter. It is in-print and online. It’s more than
200,000 book reviews. You can actually search it
for free, but you won’t get
very many results. So you can kind of look
at things, but, you know, to really have a full access you really want to get
the print addition or actually have
an online subscription. Now, I did tell you there are
a lot of free resources, right? So I’m going to actually
show you a couple of them when we get done with this list, but I just want to walk you
through a come of them. Some of them you may
be aware of. Goodreads is fantastic. It’s kind of a patron-generated
crowd source, and it can be
a little bit confusing because you kind of see
other people’s stuff, but they do have
something kind of like — It’s like a Listopia where
other users make lists of books under whatever criteria
they use. And again, this is free. And one of the things you’ll
look at later when we talk — Maybe not so traditional is
having your library profile on Goodreads,
having your library there. The next one is called
What Should I Read Next? This is probably one
of the simplest databases, and again, all these free ones
you can point your patrons to. A lot of people like to,
you know, kind of do the work themselves, and you can kind of be
a guide to that. Have them search it
and, you know, work with them. Show them how to use it. I think it’s fantastic. So What Should I Read Next?
is really simple. It kind of like a — Where you type the book title
or the author, and it recommends options
as you type. And then on the book page,
it suggests titles you might enjoy as well
as a subject list that might be found
in a library catalog, and so that’s
kind of really nice. Amazon. Amazon has got it down on suggesting books
you should buy, right? You don’t necessarily
have to buy them, though. What you can do is you can look
at the books that Amazon suggests,
and then you can, you know, check to see
if your library has them. Purchase
them for your collection. So it just kind of gives you
a little bit of information on that. This is Online Readers Sites
Wiki, which is fantastic. The New York Public Library
is another way. It’s kind of an overview about
how to do readers’ advisory. This Kitchen Sink RA I thought
was super cool because it has genre tags
linked, so those hashtags,
you know, with the pound sign, and it gives lists
of read-alikes. So it’s about four librarians,
and they have some — For instance,
they have a read-alike for the popular movie “Elf”
or for fans of Taylor Swift. So it’s just a little bit
different interface. Really kind of neat. Next one is Fantastic Fiction,
and that one is — has — boasts that it has bibliographies
for over 40,000 authors. And each author page
has a wealth of information including books by the authors, series they’ve written listed
in order, which is very important,
right, similar authors based on the activity of other
users and relevant genre pages. So it’s really kind of cool. One I really like is called Whichbook,
and what this does is… It’s fantastic
because you can kind of… You don’t necessarily have
to know the title or the author. It just uses some descriptors, and that’s one
I’m going to actually show you, so it’ll make more sense
when I show it to you. But it’s kind of a scale,
which is, you know — And you can say
you want it short or long, which is fantastic. Your Next
Read is once you’ve navigated to a book’s page, you’ll see a visual web
of similar titles around it, and you can click on a book
and it will float to the center and be surrounded by titles
that are similar to that book, so it’s really great
for visual — people who like visual. Librarything has been
around forever. It’s got a million users. It’s kind of an alternative
to Goodreads, and it allows reader reviews, book ratings,
different things like that. So it’s also another great one
Instagram. People have been really doing
a lot with Instagram. It’s a great place
for visual pictures. You know, you can put a picture
of a book. You know, this is a list
we recommend. This is a book we recommend, so it’s
kind of a cool way to do that. Gnooks I don’t know if you’ve
ever heard of before, but it’s called
a global network of discovery. Basically, you put in
three books, and it gives you suggestions
and leads. Very simple. Literature-Map you put in
the title of an — I mean, you put in an author and it kind of does,
like, a mapping. It moves around. It shows you authors
that are similar. And then a lot of times
what people forget is Worldcat. In Worldcat — I’ll show you
that really quickly at the end. You can look at Worldcat, and it
will give you subject headings, and then you can click on those. And what’s great about that is
you’re going to be able to see if your library has it. So we’ll look at that
in a minute. So what are some non-traditional
methods? And you could argue that these really aren’t
non-traditional methods, but from when I started
in library science I was used to face-to-face
readers’ advisory, so for me these are a little bit
more non-traditional. But there’s things you can do
for people… [ Sneezes ]
Excuse me. I’m so sorry. …who don’t necessarily come
to the library, and you can kind of do
a little bit of outreach. And then you’ve got
a record of it for your collection
development, right? So this is a form-based
readers’ advisory. I’m going to show you a couple
of different ones, a couple different
takes on this. This is called
Your Next Five Books. Looking for something big
and fantastic to read? Ask a librarian. You put in your name, e-mail,
library card number, and then you answer
a few questions. This is a different one. This is actually the e-mail
response to that form, and just kind of
gives you a sample of it. Again, Seattle Public Library
does a lot of stuff. Again, this is the Williamsburg
Regional Library. This form is a little bit
different, where they get to pick,
you know, types of material, genres, different things like that,
if they like large print. And then this is Five For Five. This is a — This is
the Cuyahoga Library. Sorry. And it’s called Need
a Good Read. And so it’s just
a very simple — two titles. I mean, three doc titles
and authors. Another thing is we’ve got
to take advantage of Facebook and social media. This is, again, the Seattle
Public Library doing outreach. You know, looking for ideas
for books to give for Christmas? Tune in tomorrow from 10 to 5. You know, it’s got a place
they can do that. And then also, this is
the Multnomah County Library, and this is —
What they did here is they said, “List the last three books
that you’ve read, and we’ll suggest
your next read.” Similar.
Very interactive. Also you could put staff-created
lists out on Facebook, which is
a fantastic thing to do, or you find a list
on one of these other sources that I showed you. Crowd sourcing. You get other people to talk
about good books that they’ve read, which is
a great thing to do, too. And they post their books. Put it on the ‘gram. I mean, that’s the latest thing
with the younger population that I interact with. And again, you can do
all kinds of things. You can post a picture
of a book display. Here is our spring reads. It’s fantastic. Also if you have a library blog,
blogs are still crazy popular. And people — You can do it
for staff. Staff can post things. Authors can promote things
on your blog or patrons. You know, here is a book
I read that was fantastic. Again, it’s much
more interaction. You might require a lot more. And also take advantage
of your community organizations and have them share
or reshare. This is from The Seattle Times, and they shared about
the Seattle Library’s shelf that they had books on. Also, like I said earlier,
put your library on Goodreads. Put your library
on Librarything. So this is Scottdale Public
Library’s profile, and they talk about things
that they’ve read. And you just, you know,
follow them. It’s fantastic. Also libraries have pages
on Pinterest. I don’t use Pinterest as much
as I used to, but, you know, here is a list
of films in the Florida Keys that’s a Pinterest page. And don’t have any fear
about this. You know, you don’t have
to read a book a day. Like I said, you don’t have to
know every library on the shelf. And really, the measure
of your success is not whether the reader actually
accepts your suggestions. Success is when readers realize
that the library is a place that they can go
to talk about books and find things they like
to read and not be intimidated. So real quickly, I’m just going
to share my screen. We’ve got about 4 minutes, and I just want to show you
a couple of those tools that I think are
especially helpful. So give me just a second, and I
will share my screen with you. And I can still see the chat,
so if you need help with something, let me know. Okay. So just a couple of sites
I want to share with you. And I could do a whole webinar
just on these sites. So if that’s something that
you’re interested in, just, you know,
put that in your evaluation. So this is called Whichbook. They do have lists
that they generate. If you click on W Lists,
they give you “Slapstick,” “Back Luck” and “Trouble.” You can kind of mouse around
and kind of get dizzy here, but they’ve got
different books lists that can help you
or your patrons. Let me click on home real quick. But this is —
This is really cool. So I like mysteries and murder. And I know why I read
these things because my life is pretty boring
most of the time. So I know why I read
what I read, so it’s very — you know, you can kind of — You don’t have to know
the names of any authors. You just click on this scale. So for instance
if I want to do — I’m thinking of a murder mystery
of something like that, detective fiction, I could click on, you know,
I want it to be serious and maybe a little disturbing
and unpredictable. Maybe not so violent, you know, and then I want
a short read, right? I guess there’s not as many. Anyways, and you click on go, and it’s going to select
some books for you. Best matches.
Good matches. You can look at an extract
of the book. There’s parallels. There’s a profile
you can find similar, so super easy to use, right? Yes, we are going to share
the PowerPoint, Grace. And if not, just e-mail me. And I’ll give my e-mail
at the end, but I believe that the recording
and PowerPoint will definitely be shared.
Okay. Another one I want to show you
is called Literature-Maps. So for instance,
if I put in James Lee Burke… and it tries to help me because
I didn’t capitalize his word. But you can see that James Lee
Burke is here in the middle. And John Sanford I’ve read. I like him.
I like Lee Chad. I like Michael Connelly. See, they’re all related authors
that can kind of map and help you. The next one is What
Should I Read Next? And so I also like books
by Nelson DeMille. Again, it requires somebody
knowing the author, and I can click
on search or enter. Give me just a second. Maybe I need to type
his name again. Sorry about that.
All right. So it’ll try to help you
find a book. I’m going to click on
“Plum Island.” Taking a second. So these are all genres
that you can click on or different aspects,
and there’s — You know, here is other books
by him that would be interesting to you
or other authors. Again it really —
Really kind of cool. The other one is Gnooks,
and again, this is one where you type
in the title of three books. So if I say one of my favorite
authors is John Sanford. One of my favorite
authors is — Okay. Stop trying to help me. James Lee Burke.
Yep. And then one of my
favorite authors is — Let’s see.
Michael Connelly. And you click on continue. It says that this may be
something that you would like, a new author you might like. Of course, there’s a bunch
of ads and stuff. Just ignore that. And so you can look at that,
and look at that author. This is kind of a really
great site on how to find
your next favorite book and some readers’
advisory sources. Again, Amazon. Really fantastic.
It knows what I like. It’s suggesting some books. I would take this and see
if my library has it electronically
or in print. And then, like I said, Worldcat. People kind of forget
about that. And what’s great about that
is you can see if your library
has it right there. Or, like I said, look at your
own library catalog because you can click
on subjects. You can click on characters. It’s cataloged, right? So use the tools that we’ve put
together through history being good catalogers. So again, the title of my book
is “Plum Island.” It’s by Nelson DeMille. I’m going to click
on search everything. Hopefully it saved this. I can click on “Plum Island.” And then down here, right,
we’ve done all this work. We’ve done this work
in our libraries. So “Treasure Trove” is fiction. And you can click on that,
and it’s going to bring up all the other books. I can click on John Corey. He’s one of
my favorite characters. So every book that’s I Worldcat,
you know, most of the libraries
in the world, is going to bring up
every book by him. And then what I can do
is I can click on the book. I can scroll down,
and I can enter my zip code. And I can see, “Hey, the
Wetumpka Public Library has it.” Or you can, you know,
type your zip code in and see
if your library has it. So again, don’t forget
about Worldcat. It’s free.
We’ve done all the work to put things in Worldcat,
right? So those are just some options. So I’m going to stop
sharing my screen. Go back to my PowerPoint. Because we’re about out of time. Okay, so please, have no more
fear about readers’ advisory. And last but not least, if you look at your collection
development policies, all the information
about your users, and meet that up
with readers’ advisories you’re going to get
that sweet spot where we’re speaking
to our users. We’re speaking to our community. So thank you very much. If you have any —
Oh, I forgot. So I do have one more
role-playing activity for you. It is — I’ll put the link
in the chat, and you’ll also get a copy
of this PowerPoint. But this is kind of a way
you can interact and practice
readers’ advisory with another librarian
or, you know, your family. Whatever you’d like to do, and it just kind of helps you
get better at it. So it’s just — I just call it,
“Hey, girl. About your last book –” You know, referring
to the character in all those memes out there. But it might be something fun
you’d like to do. So thank you very much. If you have any questions,
please let me know. I’m going to paste the links
for most of the stuff in the chat box real quick. But as I do that, please let me
know if you have any questions. I’m so glad you learned a lot!
Thank you so much! And again, like I said, I don’t think
that readers’ advisory can exist
with collection development. And, you know, if you don’t have
collection development you can’t really
do readers’ advisory if you don’t have
that information. So thank you very much, and I’m really glad
that you guys came today. And if there’s something more
about this presentation you would like to see, please put it
in your evaluation. Beckwith: Okay.
Thank you, Stephanie, for such
an informative webinar. Attendees, if you enjoyed
this webinar we ask that you join us
on March 6th at 10:00 a.m. Eastern for Stephanie’s
next webinar, “Is It True? How to Verify Digital Sources
Like a Rock Star.” As always, we encourage you
to keep an eye on this with C.E. calendar, the SWFLN Facebook page
or your messages from the LISTSERV
for more training. Thank you for attending, and have a terrific rest
of your day!

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