Chinese Pronunciation – Chinese Vowels

Chinese Pronunciation – Chinese Vowels


Hi everyone.
Welcome to The Ultimate Chinese Pronunciation Guide. In this lesson, you’ll learn all the Chinese vowels
and their variant vowel sounds. With these sounds, you can pronounce any vowel that could possibly appear in Chinese! Some vowels may be hard for you to distinguish, especially for English speakers, so make sure you listen carefully! Remember that memorizing and reproducing the
sound is the goal. Don’t get too frustrated if you forget when to use the variant sounds, that’ll come naturally later. Are you ready?
Then let’s get started! The first vowel is… This is almost identical to the A sound in the word ‘father’, except the tongue is in
more of a neutral position. When you say the word ‘father’, do you feel
a small pressure at the back of your mouth? The idea is to relieve that pressure, keeping
everything in the same position, just move
your tongue forward a bit. You can kind of get a feel for this if you
over exaggerate the ‘ah’ in “father” by
opening your mouth as wide as possible. When you move your tongue forward, you will relieve that pressure and it should
sound a little whinier as a result. Study how Yinru pronounces this sound. When paired with the following, the A changes… It becomes identical to the A sound in the
word ‘father’. When paired with the following, the A changes… It becomes identical to the E sound in the
word ‘red’. The next vowel is… It’s identical to the E sound at the end of
the word ‘problem’. When paired with the following, the E changes… It becomes similar to the A sound in the word ‘play’, however, try not to carry over the Y sound too much. Try to relax your jaw, and say it as if your allowing the vowel to spill out from your mouth. Listen to how Yinru pronounces this vowel. When paired with the following, the E changes… When paired like this, it becomes the E sound in ‘red’ from before. This is identical to the previous sound but
with rounded lips. Try saying the E in ‘red’ while rounding your lips. Now listen to how Yinru says it. When paired with the following, the E changes… It’s similiar to the O sound in the word ‘boring’ but with unrounded lips. You’ll find that when you start unrounding
your lips, it’ll start to change to more of a
U sound. Try it! Now listen to how Yinru pronounces it. The next vowel is… It’s identical to the double E sound in
the word ‘see’. When paired with the following, the I changes… This is similar to the previous sound. It’s
kind of like the double E sound in the
word ‘see’, except your tongue is a little
bit further back in the mouth, in a more
centralized position. One trick to pronouncing this vowel, is to
say the word ‘ye’, as in ‘O ye of little faith’. The Y sound should raise your tongue to the
correct position in the mouth. Try it! Now listen to how Yinru pronounces this vowel. When paired with the following, the I changes… It’s identical to the short I sound in the word ‘bit’. The next vowel is… It’s identical to the OU sound in the word ‘ought’. When paired with the following, the O changes… It’s identical to the double O sound in the
word ‘hook’. When paired with the following, the O changes… The O becomes a little bit like the O sound
in the word ‘owe’. However, try not to carry over the W sound too much. And the last vowel is… It’s similar to the double O sound in the
word ‘boot’. However, you want to slightly
pout your lips more and exaggerate the rounding. Listen to how Yinru pronounces this vowel. When paired with the following, the U changes… This is like the double E sound in ‘see’ but
with rounded lips. Try saying the double E in ‘see’ while rounding your lips. Now listen to how Yinru pronounces this vowel. Well done! You’ve just learned all vowels
and their variant sounds in Chinese. With these sounds, you can properly pronounce
any vowel that could possibly appear in the Chinese language! Isn’t that great?
Well that’s all for vowels. In the next lesson, you’ll start learning
consonant sounds. Which vowel sound was the most difficult for
you to learn? Please comment and share your thoughts. See you in the next Ultimate Chinese Pronunciation Guide lesson!

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  1. This is the best Chinese pronunciation video I have seen! Please do more. When are you guys going to upload the consonants video?

  2. Actually, you cannot make real voice by reading the Chinese phonetics one letter by one as you do in English, if you do like that, I promise you never speck native Chinese, you should practice Chinese phonetics in groups, for example, you should not practice all these a sound in different groups, you just practice how to speak "ao" sound, "an" sound or "ai" sound, Chinese has finite vowels group, less than 20, all the vowel phonetics fall in these finite groups, remember this vowel groups plus Consonant, then you'll be liberated form remembering these complicated variant of a letter. we Chinese students don't learn vowels like this video, we only learn how to read vowel group composed of of some letters . Chinese Pinyin is not as scientific as English phonetics and has a history of less than 60 years. fortunately Chinese has not that much sounds like English. maybe Tones is difficult for you, although most of Chinese can speak Tones of Mandarin, they cannot speak tones of Cantonese which has 9 kind of tones whiles only 4 for Mandarin. I ma practicing all kinds of English vowels that makes me almost crazy!!!!!

  3. guess what you forgot one vowel for the Chinese thing. The last vowel after u is actually the u and the colon but the colon is horizontal.

  4. Hola, Buenos días, and Ciao mean Hi, Good Morning, and Hello! Sorry, About my Spanish-Speaking and Italian-Speaking

  5. According to The Sounds of Chinese Phonetics by Yen – Hwei Lin there is no ɨ
    in Standard Mandarin. Where did this info come from? Are you simplifying the apical vowel concept?

  6. isnt 他 also she?? i thought it was just guessing wether its she or he,, i am very new to chinese so please excuse if this is a stupid question haha

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