How to Make Butter | Pioneer Days Field Trip | KidVision Pre-K

How to Make Butter | Pioneer Days Field Trip | KidVision Pre-K


(banjo music) – Hi, I’m Miss Penny.
– Hello. – And these are the KidVision kids, and we’re here today to
find out how children 100 years ago played,
lived, and went to school. – Well, excellent. My name is Miss Kim, and I’d like to welcome you to the Old Davie School Historical Museum. We’re gonna learn about what
life was like 100 years ago right here in Florida. Are you guys ready? – Yes.
– All right, let’s go. – Great. (chuckles) Come on. (bell tinkling) (popping) – Well, welcome to our pioneer house. A pioneer is somebody who does
something for the first time. So, the families that
we’re learning about today were some of the first families to farm where we are right now. So we’re gonna look at the type of house that they built 100 years ago. – We’re gonna see how they lived. Do you think their rooms might look different than your house? – [Child] Yeah. – You think so?
– Yes. – Let’s find out. Are you ready? – Yup,
– Okay. – [Devin] I wanna try. – Come on inside. All right, so if we take a look around we’ll see things that are
different from our houses today. If you look up, we don’t
have any lights on in here. – [Child] No. – But there’s no electricity in the house 100 years ago. If they needed light where it was dark, they’d have a lamp and
they would light that, and that would give them
enough light to see. And if you look around,
it’s not a very big house. But four or five people
would’ve lived here. – [Miss Penny] What do you
notice about this house that’s different from your house? – It just have wood. – It’s made out of wood.
– It’s made out of wood. Some of the walls and the
roof were made out of tin. And I only see one bed. Where do you think they slept? – [Child] On the floor. – [Miss Kim] On the floor. Sometimes the kids curled up on the floor. – There’s no bathroom. – Not inside of the house. – [Child] They go outside to do it. – [Miss Penny] They went outside to do it? – [Miss Kim] It was called the outhouse. – [Miss Penny] Oh, my goodness. (jazz music) (door bangs lightly) Children in pioneer
times had a lot of chores to do around their home. Like sweeping, helping to
cook, and doing laundry. (jazz music) – 100 years ago kids helped their families on the farm by doing chores. Some of the chores they had were helping in the vegetable garden, washing clothes, milking the cow, and
helping to make butter, which is what we’re gonna get to do today. You guys like butter? – Yeah! – Excellent, so make butter. First, you have to milk the cow. And from that milk, you get cream, and that’s what’s inside
your jars right now. We’re gonna shake,
shake, shake that cream, and that cream is gonna
split into the solid butter and the liquid butter milk. Can you guys listen to it? Do you hear the liquid in there right now? – [Child] Yeah. – We’re gonna keep shaking, and it’s gonna turn into a solid. (upbeat jazz music) There we go. – [Miss Penny] We made butter
by shaking the cream in a jar, we converted it from a liquid to a solid. (jazz music) (bell tinkling) (popping) – One of the chores the
kids helped their family do was bringing in the water for the cooking, the cleaning, and the wash. So you bring your bucket out to your well. We have our well pump right here. And you would pump the
water just like this, (water gushing) until your bucket was full and you’d have to carry it inside and start all over again. – [Miss Penny] So, they had
no running water in the house? – No running water inside their house. Not in the bathroom, not in the kitchen. You would drink water right
from the well like this. – Are you thirsty? – [Children] Yes. – [Miss Penny] Great,
let’s pump some water. Do you wanna be the first one? Okay. (whistling Western music) (bell tinkling) (popping) – So this is where kids went
to school 100 years ago. – Wow! 100 years ago! – Do you guys like to see what
the classroom looked like? – [Children] Yeah! (light music) (school bell ringing) – When the teacher rings the school bell that means it’s time for class. So you gotta be sitting up tall,
hands crossed on your desk. This is what the class
looked like 100 years ago. And in this classroom you
see the great big windows that let in lots of light,
and lots of air too. No electricity in this school. And they learned lots of the same things that we learn at school today. Do you learn about reading at school? – Yeah. – Do you learn about
numbers and math at school? – [Layla And Ethan] Yes. – Excellent, do you learn about writing? – [Layla And Ethan] Yeah. – Excellent, well they practiced
writing with chalk first. And once you learned your letters, we got to use the dip
pen in the classroom. So we’re gonna get to practice
that type of pen today. – Wow, what do you usually
write your name with when you’re at school? – [Harley And Layla] A pencil. – [Miss Penny] A pencil. – And when you put that
pencil on the paper, you can keep writing. This type of pen, you’re gonna
have to dip it into the ink, write a little bit,
dip into the ink again, write a little bit, back and
forth until you’re all done. – Would you like to give it a try? – Yeah. (soft music) (bell tinkling) (popping) – Let’s play an old-fashioned game. We’re gonna play musical chairs. – Wow, who knows how
to play musical chairs? – Me. – Tell me, how do you play? – You walk around them. – [Miss Penny] You walk around the chairs, and then what happens
when the music stops? – Somebody has to find a chair. – Everyone finds a chair. (record player creaks) (jazz music) – Oh, jeez.
– Oh no. (crying) (jazz music) – [Miss Kim] Whoo, oh no! (Ethan grunts) Oh no. (jazz music) (girl giggles) – Oh! (laughs) You got it.
– You did. (bouncy jazz music) (Layla giggles) – Oh!
– Oh! – Good job! (laughing) – [Miss Penny] Come on buddy. (jazz music) Yay!
– Yay! Ah, it’s okay. (laughs) – [Miss Penny] Here you go. – You guys did a great job. – [Miss Penny] Very proud. – Yes.
– Come on. – [Everybody] Bye! (banjo music)

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