Introduction to Library Services

Introduction to Library Services


This workshop will run for approximately 40 minutes and will demonstrate how to search for print and electronic material as well as point out where to find other key Library resources. The CSU Library is more than just a place to borrow books. we provide a range of services and resources which are designed and developed to meet the needs of students and staff both on and off campus and today we’re going to look at
some of these services and resources. So we’ll just move ahead and look at some of the topics we’re going to cover in today’s workshop. During this session we’re going to locate
and explore the student Library homepage, we’re going to look at the orientation
toolbox, we’re going to discuss the Library’s discovery tool Primo Search including how to search for books and electronic resources like e-books, journal articles, and how to locate your e-reserve material through Primo Search as well. Many of you here today are Distance
Education students so we’re also going to show you how to request items to be sent out to your home address and for any Internal Students that are here we’re going to show you how to get requests sent to your campus Library from another
campus Library and we’re also going to look at other key resources such as Library Guides for your area of study and where to get help from the Library. This is going to be a live demonstration so I’m just going to switch screens now. I’ll stop sharing this PowerPoint and I’ll start sharing my desktop. Now hopefully what you can see on your
screen now is the CSU Current Students site or student portal. It’d be great if anybody could pop into the chat window there and let me know if that’s what
you can see. Excellent, that’s great. As I mentioned I will just increase the
screen size a little just to make it easier for you to see. Okay just a little bit. Let me know if you’re having any problems seeing what we’re looking at. Ok, so we’re at the Current Students homepage now. This is the page that most of you will
be most familiar with. It’s where you find Interact and linked to your subject sites and that sort of thing. Getting to the Library from this page, all you need to do is have a look at this black navigation bar here it sits towards the top of the screen. And you can see we’ve got a Library
tab just there. You can hover over the Library tab and link to any of the resources that you can see in the menu here, or click on the Library tab itself and you’ll be taken into the student’s Library homepage. However this is not the only place you
will find links to Library resources. For example you might find our Primo Search widget which is out catalogue. You might find it appearing in lots of other
places like in our Library Guides. Also notice at the top of the screen there is
a link to the Library here and you should see this link on any CSU page that you’re in except for you Interact sites and then the link appears down
towards the bottom of the screen. Do you have to automatically log into the
student page? You will have to login. I’ve already logged in today so it’s taking me straight in. I’ll just take you and show you
what happens when you click on the Library link at the top of the CSU page. This takes
you over to our main Library site So actually the Library has two presences
within the CSU website. We’ve got the student’s Library
site and then we’ve got the main Library homepage. It is good to be aware that there are two Library sites however, the links listed on both pages all lead to the same place. so it doesn’t matter which site you use just whatever you’re most comfortable
with. We’re just going to head back to the
Library page and student portal now. The first thing we’re going to do is we’re going to have a look at the Library orientation toolbox. We can link to that by scrolling down and clicking on the ‘training tutorials and videos’ link that sits below the ‘study and research’ menu on our Library home page and then from this page we can link to the
library orientation toolbox. Now there are four steps in this tool box. The first step for you is the CSU card
step. Order your CSU card. You have to remember that your CSU
ID card is also your Library card so when the CSU card is created for you a library record is activated for you. So
you really do need to get this CSU card if you want access to all of our
resources. If you are on campus at any time your card allows you to access the
24/7 Learning Commons which is situated within the Library buildings. It also
allows you to process self-check loans through the self-check machines, to borrow
directly from the library loans desk, and to print copy and scan. For distance education students having this card also activates you Library record giving you
full access to view our resources, to request items, and to place photocopy
requests. But just on a side note, if you are a student studying through
CSU by one of our partner institutions please check with your institution’s
arrangements first as there are different conditions. So for example our Melbourne and Sydney Study Center students only have access to online resources and not to our physical resources such as books. Any physical resources for these study centre students are located on site at their study
centre libraries. If you’re interested in more information about partner institutes Janine might be able to pop up a
link in the chat box for you. Now the other three steps in the orientation
toolbox will ensure that you have all the basics to start your study including
where to find help when you need it however, if you haven’t already requested
your student ID card please do that first. That’s the first thing you need to be doing.
Now we’ll leave the orientation toolbox and head back to the student Library
homepage. Thank you for putting that link up, Janine. I might just talk a little bit now about the virtual and the physical Library. CSU Library has the two presences we have the virtual Library and the physical Libraries. These can be
accessed by both distance and internal students. We have five Libraries from
which you can borrow and we have at the moment available over 600,000 physical
items including books, DVDs, kits, and AV material. The CSU Library is an
academic library so the material we collect is of a high standard and targeted
towards the courses taught at CSU. It is the material that your lecturers want to see in your references. Distance Education students can request items to be sent to their home address free of charge and students living within Australia will
even receive a reply paid sticker to return the item. So even return postage is free of charge. You can even use the parcel it came in to
return it. Just keep postal times in mind. Postall times are usually around
two to three days but can take up to seven days depending on where you are living.
If you’re living in a remote area postage times might take a little bit longer. ln addition to our physical libraries and our physical collections, we also have a significant collection of electronic resources. Our virtual presence includes access to over 60,000 online journal titles, and upwards of a hundred thousand electronic books. These electronic resources can be a great
option for everybody because they’re so easily accessible anywhere anytime you
don’t have to wait for a book to be posted out to you. And now we’re going to take a look at how to locate some of these resources. And we’re going do this using Primo Search. Primo Search as I might have mentioned is the Library’s main discovery tool. It is like any other online catalogue or search engine that you’d find in any other library but it searches across both our physical resources such as books and DVDs and also across our online resources, so you’ll be able to see details of a physical items but you’ll also be able to link to our
electronic resources from Primo Search. So it’s a great tool to use when you’re
researching for your assignments. Firstly let’s find out how to use Primo Search to find e-reserve material. Now e-reserve or electronic reserve contains the items that your subject lecturer has put aside for you to read. They might be chapters from
books or copies of physical journal articles and they will have been scanned
and made available electronically through e-reserve, and you can locate
them through Primo Search using your subject code. You can see here we’re looking at
the Library homepage in the student portal that we have this widget here that allows us to search Primo Search directly from this page, and you’ll also notice that we’ve got The Primo Search tab and the search reserve tab. Now Primo Search, that is what we default to here and that would search our whole
Primo Search. If you’re just looking reserve material it’s sometimes a good idea to just going here and click on ‘Search Reserve’ because that will narrow down the results to just the items that are in the e-reserve
collection. I’ll do an example search here for you I’ve clicked on the search reserve tab and we might look for readings for the subject MGT100. All you need to do is enter in your subject code here don’t put any spaces in, just the letters
and the numbers and then click on search and what this will do is open up Primo Search for us in a new tab or window. We will see we’ve got seven results
for this search so there are seven resources available in e-reserve for MGT100. Now they’re all in PDF format so they can be read online or downloaded. You can save and you can print as required. To access them all you need to do is identify the reading that you’re after then click on the ‘view online’ tab that appears below the items details. At this point you may be asked to sign in using your CSU username and password. This is only opened up in a small tab for me so that’s not very usable but don’t worry we can click on open source in a new window and get a better view here. I’ll just put in my username and password and just show you what it looks like when we access in e-reserve item. There we go it just pops up on the screen in PDF format. Now we’re going to head back to Primo Search. And we’re going to take a look at how to conduct two different types of searches. We’re going to be looking for firstly a known item and secondly we’re going to run a
topic search. So to clear our e-reserve search all I need to do is click on new search from the top right hand side of the screen and that will clear the search box for us and we can start a new search. A couple of things I want to point out on this page before I start my search have a look at the search tips that appear just below the search box there. Ther’s some really good tips there on how to run a search within Primo, and you might find some of these techniques useful when you’re looking for resources for your
assignments so take a look at these. Before we get started take note of the ‘login’ link that appears
on the top right hand side of the screen. Now there are some occasions when you
definitely need to login to Primo Search. That will be when you want to
place a loan or a copy request or when you want to have a look at your own Library record so you can see what you got on loan and make renewals that sort of
thing. But we would also advise you to log in to Primo Search any time
you want to run a search because if you are searching off campus you will
actually get more results if you are logged in. So we’ll just click on the login link now. When you click on login you might be asked for your CSU username and password again or not. It’s fairly clever and it does remember if you’ve logged in
at any other point who you are. So I had already logged into the student portal as myself and Primo Search was aware of that and has automatically logged me in
without having to enter my details again. You can see that you are successfully logged in when your name appears on the top right hand side of the screen. If you log in and what you see here is
your student ID number that is an indication that you do not have a
Library record so that’s the point at which you need to go off and order yourself your CSU Card so that your Library record can be created for you and then you have the option of placing requests through Primo Search. Our first search is a search for a known item. Say for example you’ve had a look at your subject outline and your lecturer has noted some recommended texts for you to have a look at and you’re wondeatring whether the CSU Library has these items all you need to do is come into Primo Search and then you would copy and paste or just type in the title of the item that you were looking for so the title of a book or title of a
journal article perhaps. I’ve had a look at my hypothetical subject outline the book that I want to find today is called ‘War and Peace’. So all I need to do is type in is the title in the search box there. Just take note that I’m not going to bother changing any of the limiting options that are available here. There’s no need at this point. if you do copy and paste a title it’s a good idea to remove punctuation before you run a search in Primo Search. Any sort of punctuation like perhaps a colon or a semicolon, just remove those before you run your search. It makes it a little bit easier. Then all we need to do is click on the orange search button. And you can see from that search we’ve got over five hundred and sixty-eight thousand results. That’s because we ran a keyword search
across all areas with the words ‘war’ and ‘peace’. They’re fairly common terms so they can appear in a lot of different places. But don’t worry, what you can do after running a search like this in Primo is refine your results using the options that are available on the
left hand side of the screen. Ok so for example if i’m only interested
in looking at books today, I could my results by the resource type ‘books’. Now you can see that that’s reduced our results down to six hundred and sixty. Let me go back and have a look at the results list, you can identify the type of
resource so we should have all books here because we’ve refined to that resource type. The first one in the list actually looks like the item that I’m after. It doesn’t say it’s a book but it does say multiple versions here. Now all that means is that we’ve got more than one edition of this particular title to see
some more information all we need to do is click on this ‘see all six versions/editions’ link And then we’ll have all of those editions listed on the screen for us. Now from my subject outline I know that I’m interested in looking at the 2005 edition of ‘War and Peace’, and that’s appearing second in my results list here. If you want to see a little bit more information about a tile in PrimoSearch use the tabs that appear below the items details so you can have a look at the
details tab. This sometimes gives you chapter headings it hasn’t for this item but it might particularly for textbooks, give you
chapter headings and that could be really useful if you
want to make a photocopy request. It also tells you information like when the book was published and it gives you these subject headings which can offer alternative keywords for
other searches on this particular topic. The Browse shelf tab is also an
interesting one. Many can go into a physical library, you
can do this yourself you can locate a book on the shelf and then browse the shelves to look at other titles sitting around that particular book and you might be able to identify
another title that’s going to be useful for you. As a lot of people can’t actually get to a physical library these days we’ve got a virtual option available for you in Primo. Also take note of the actions tab that appears towards the right hand side of the screen here. That gives you the option to add the record for this item to your own folder in Primo Search. But keep in mind it’s a good idea to be logged in to Primo before you start adding things to a folder. If you haven’t logged into
Primo Search and you start adding things to your folder they won’t be retained, so next time you
come into Primo you won’t have that folder there but if you’ve logged in
first then they will sit in your folder, and next time you login that will be there for you. You can also do things like email the record of this item to yourself and if you are using the program EndNote you can also use this link here the EndNote RIS link to send
the citation across to your EndNote library. Now EndNote is a bibliographic management software. It’s a tool you can use to store and manage your references and you
can even use it in conjunction with Word to insert citations and references into
a document. If you would like to learn more about EndNote you can sign up for
one of our other online Library Workshops that we’re running
specifically on using EndNote for both PC and Macs. If you wanted to request this particular item we’ll head over to the availability and requests tab and we should be able to see a bit more information about the item. You should be able to see more information about the particular item in this tab. For some reason that was not working for that particular book so I’ve gone down to the second book. When you click on the availability and request tab, you will see the location of the item so what Library holds that particular item so we can see this copy is held at the Albury and at the Bathurst campuses and we can see that at each of these campuses there is one copy and one available meaning that they’re available for loan at
the moment. Because we have already logged into Primo Search we also get the request options, the request, and the digitization options that you can see here. If we had not logged in yet these options would not appear. So you would need to go ahead then and log in and go back and have a look at the particular item. To make a photocopy request which is called digitization in Primo we click on the digitization link and this
is where we can copy a portion of a physical item for you. So we can copy of
one chapter or 10% of the total page numbers of a particular book for you or
a physical journal article for you. Those restrictions are applied according to
Australian Copyright Law so unfortunately we can’t copy any more
than the 10% or the one chapter. But it might be useful if you’ve got a reading from a book saying you only need one chapter. To place that request we just fill in
all of the details as requested so it’s good to have page numbers and
perhaps a chapter name and then you click on the request acknowledge copyright link
and that request is submitted for you. what happens then the Library staff will go and collect the item from the shelves, they will scan that portion of the book for you and it will be emailed to you. If we wanted to instead of requesting a digitization request the whole book, so request a loan
of the book all we need to do here is click on request. We need to select the
pickup location so for internal students who want the book transferred to another
campus you select the campus that you are located at. For distance education students in this
list you will have the option of selecting home address. So you select
home address and that just ensure that we’ll be able to post a book out to your home
address. I don’t have that home address option appearing in my dropdown menu there
because I’m not a distance education student. I’m located at the Orange Campus
Library so I might just say that I would like this book delivered to Orange. You
don’t need to fill in these other details here on the screen. Normally just leave them blank unless
you know the specific date you no longer need the item or if you’re a distance
education students and you perhaps have a temporary new address you might like to
put that in the comments field just there. Otherwise just leave those fields blank
scroll down and hit the request acknowledged copyright button. And that
request has been submitted. Take note of your place in the que, if a book is in high demand, you might be sitting second third or fourth in the
que. This one is not in high demand so I’m first in the que. Just a note about the
photocopy or digitalization requests keep in mind that we do actually have to
have the physical book available in the Library to fullfill a photocopy
request so if you place a photocopy request on a book that is currently
on loan we will have to wait until the book’s returned to be able to fill that request. So I’ve placed a request on that particular item if I decided I no longer wanted
that book I can actually delete that request for myself. All I need to go into is my Library record and I can do that by clicking on the link at the top right
hand side of the Primo Search screen. And here I can see my Library record so I can see the items that I have on loan at the moment. If I wanted to renew any of these
items all I need to do is tick the box adjacent to the title I’d like to renew
and then click on renew selected. Now the standard loan period is 28 days on books and you will have the option of renewing about four times just so long as nobody
else has requested that particular item. If somebody else has requested that
particular item you will not be able to renew it. If we wanted to delete that
request we just placed all I need to do is hit request in my menu on the left
hand side of the screen there. See the request that I’ve just placed appearing here and I have the option of canceling that request so we’ll do that now. If you’re unsure of any of these actions just contact us at any time will be able to walk you through the process of placing a
request for a loan or a request for a digitisation. What we’re going to do now is we’re going to clear the search that we just ran so we’ll click on new search to clear the search in Primo and we’re going to try a topic search in Primo now. Instead of looking for a known item I’m just looking for information on a particular topic so it might be an assignment topic. My topic
today is Library marketing so all I need to do is type those keywords into my
search box and click on search. I’ve not changed any of the limiters there again, I’m just clicking on search. And you can see here we’ve got over four-hundred and ninety thousand results. So there’s a lot of resources available to you through
Primo Search, all different resource types, you can see the different resource
types appearing in the little icons to the left of each item’s details so we’ve got eBooks, we’ve got journal articles. 490,000, that’s a lot of results and it’s
probably too many to go through so at this point it’s worth considering using
some of the search techniques that I pointed out to you on the Primo Search
home screen we can do for example instead of just doing a keyword search we can instead do a phrase search in Primo Search. So what I’ll do is I’ll just put my two terms “library marketing” within inverted commas and this is going to force Primo Search to search for those two words as a phrase rather than individual instances of those two words. So my
original search, Primo Search which was just searching for those two words anywhere in
the records of all of these items so one of the words might have appeared in the title another of the words might have appeared in the publishing information so a phrase search is a good
way of refining or targeting your search So we can do that by adding those inverted commas or you could also have selected the ‘limit your search’ option with my exact
phrase. Both of them do exactly the same thing. And then all we need to do is click on search. And you can see that’s refined our results considerably. Again we’ve got a wide range of resource types listed and of course we have the
option again of refining our results by resource type.
There are other refining options available. If I scroll down you can see
if you can also refine by date so if you’re only interested in recently
published information you could refine to perhaps the last five or six years. So we’ll just enter in here 2010 to 2016 and click on refine and you can see that’s reduced our results list down again to 152 so it’s becoming more and more manageable. If at this point we were perhaps only interested in electronic books we
could refine our results by that resource type so you can combine more
than one of these refining options and you can see here they appear just above your results list so you can see what you’ve refined by. We’ve refined by day and
resource type and we’ve now only got 32 results. If you wanted to access one of
these electronic books all you need to do from Primo Search is click on the ‘View
online’ tab that appears below the items details and then follow the links that
appear in the box here. So we will follow the EBL link. And this takes us across from the Library into the interface of the supplier of this electronic book in this example it’s EBL
or eBook Library. It might at that point also ask you to enter your CSU username and password to access the interface but again it’s just your standard CSU username and password. From this site we’ve got the option of reading this particular electronic book
online or downloading the item. Now to download keep in mind that you need the Adobe Digital Editions program that’s a free program that you can access online
and then you would have the option of downloading to read the item offline
for a particular period of time. If you’re interested in finding out more
about electronic books we do have an electronic books guide available on our
website and Janine might be able to pop up a link to that eBooks Library Guide
for us. Now I’m just going to close the screen and head back to my Primo Search search. I’m going to remove the eBooks limiter, I’m going to search
instead for a different type of resource so now I’m interested in looking for journal
articles. You’ll see on the left hand side of the screen we have the option to refine our results by journal articles but we also have the option to refine by peer
reviewed journals. Now it is a good idea to select the peer reviewed journals
option because this ensures that your results are going to be academic or
scholarly in nature. Content from peer reviewed journals has been evaluated by subject experts before its publication. That’s how you can be assured that the
content is of an academic nature and you will see that term peer reviewed popping up during your studies. You’ll often find your lecturers has asked you to find peer reviewed
resources for your assignments and refining your results by peer review
journals in Primo Search is one of the ways you can identify these peer
reviewed resources. If you’re interested in learning more about peer review and how to identify if an item is reviewed or not you might want to sign up for our electronic journals Online Library
Workshop that will be happening in the next couple of weeks there’ll be some more information in that for you. At the end of today’s session I’ll show you where to go to sign up for the Online Library Workshops. OK so we’ll click on peer reviewed journals
here and refine our results list down. We’ve got 67 items at this point if you want to see a little bit more information about a particular item you can click on the the ‘Details’ tab
and if you want to access the full text of the item just click on the ‘View online’ tab just like we did with the electronic book and follow the links that appear. This has just opened up that particular article for us in the EBSCOhost database who is the supplier of this particular article. We’ve got the abstract up on the screen at the moment
if we want to access to full text all all we need to do is click on the PDF full text link. And there we go it just pops up on the screen for us. OK so that’s pretty much the basics of how to find resources for your studies using Primo Search. Janine might also be able to pop a link up
in the chat box for us to our training, tutorials and videos page. On that page
we’ve got a whole list of video tutorials about how to access electronic
journals and other resources that you’ll find on the library website. Library staff
have created these very short video tutorials to assist you using these
resources and they are great little resources they’re only a couple of minutes long and they just give you a reminder about how to use the resources. We’re going to leave Primo Search behind now and we’re going to head back to the Library student homepage. We’re going to look at some of the other key links on this page. So we’ve
got many other useful resources and services for you. Firstly we will have a look at our journal databases. Now just a note about what journal databases are. Journal
databases are collections of journals, articles, conference papers, reports and
more generally arranged by subject. Some of them list abstracts in their collection and some will hold the full text of the articles themselves. Journal databases
are subscribed resources that means they are not freely available resources so
you won’t find these resources in full text just by doing a Google search. You
do need to access them through the Library website. The Library has paid or
subscribe to these resources so that you can access them without any cost to you.
Most of the content in these journal databases that we subscribe to is
actually findable through Primo Search. So we were searching the journal
databases content just a moment ago. But it is also useful to be able to search
them individually as they are generally subject specific so will often return a more
targeted search then Primo allows and they also have many options for expanding and
refining your search results. To access the journal databases all you need to do is
hover over the Library tab and click on journal databases. Now we have so many of them, we have
hundreds of them available that what we’ve done is organized them by subject
area of discipline so you can go in and have a look at our subject or discipline
area that you’re interested in. And again this is really slow I’m sorry. Go back and try again. That’s much better that time. OK. We’re on the journal databases page and you can see the different subject areas that we have
organized the databases into. So say for example if you were studying nursing
just click on the nursing subject area and you can see all of the journal
databases that we have access to that might be relevant for your subject area.
Now there are a lot in these lists but it does help to have a look at the blurb
that appears below the databases title and we do rank them by relevancy on
these pages so if you’re not sure which database to use take a look at the first couple. Let’s head back to
student home page again and we’ll have a look at our Library Guides. To access the Library Resource Guides just click on the Library Resource Guides link that sits below the study and
research tools menu. Now these are guides that are created by CSU librarians for CSU
students. You can see here that there are a range of subject areas. What we’ve done
is tried to bring our electronic resources together for you into subject areas just to make it easier for you
to identify resources that are going to be useful for you. There are also some
other useful guides apart from the subject guides that appear on this site.
Have a look on the top right hand side of the screen here and you can see links
to our eBooks guides so if you need any more information about e-books have a look at
this guide. There is a link to our EndNote guide, we mentioned EndNote a little
earlier so if you’re interested in learning more about EndNote have a look at that guide and the mobile devices for study and research that’s also a really useful guide. I’ll just show you what one of a subject
guides looks like. I’ll go in and have a look at the education studies guide. You can
see here that we’ve got the Primo Search widget appearing again so you can search
Primo directly from this page, and you can use the navigational tabs at the top of
the screen to locate other resources that we’ve collected for you. So there are journal databases on education and there’s also links to some other web resources. Let’s
head back to the Student Library page again. The next thing I want to show you is Google Scholar just very quickly. And we can get to Google Scholar from the find books and other resources page. Some students find Google Scholar to be a
useful resource because it allows you to search the internet for scholarly
resources. It allows natural language searching so it’s quite easy to use but
it does have some limitations. Firstly, it doesn’t allow you to refine your
search as well as Primo Search or the journal databases do and you’ll also
find resources in Google Scholar that you are not able to access but I’ll just show you
how to locate CSU subscribed resources through Google Scholar. I’ll just hit the search button here and I’ll go into the Google Scholar page. The first thing you need to do when you go into Google Scholar is setup your preferences. To do that we need to find the settings
link, we then need to go into library links and we need to make sure that we have Charles Sturt University ticked on this page. If it does not appear here all you need to do is type in Charles Sturt University, search, it will appear below
the search box, tick the box and click on save. What that’s then going to do is when
you run a search and you have your list of results it will identify particular items that you can access through CSU Library and it will also enables you to link straight to those resources. I’ll run a really quick search and I’ll show you what that looks like. So we
might just search here for library marketing again just as we did in Primo. So any of these particular
resources that have a ‘Find it at CSU’ link to the right of the item details Oh, Janine. Does somebody want to say something again before I go on? So was that how to set up the library
links in Google Scholar? I’ll run through that again. OK so when you open up Google Scholar I linked to it through the Library page but you can just go
straight into Google Scholar yourself so just do a search for Google Scholar. I’ll do that now. Google Scholar. And what we’re going to do here is setup our preferences to show CSU Library holdings within Google Scholar. We need to go to Settings and then into the library links. You can see that appearing on the left hand side of the screen. And what we need to do is make sure that Charles Sturt University appears in our list here of Library links. If it does not appear just type Charles Sturt University into the search box, click on ‘Search’, it
will then appear you’ll just need to tick the box that’s ajacent to Charles Sturt University and
click on ‘Save’. And then you’ll be able to go ahead and run your search in Google Scholar and you’ll be able to see CSU holdings that way. OK, so you do see in Google Scholar that you get a huge amount of results. Sometimes that’s not great sometimes it’s good if you’re having trouble
finding resources anywhere else. Anything that has a ‘Find it at CSU’ link
appearing to the right of the items details, that indicates that that
particular item is held by CSU Library in one of our subscribed databases. All we need to do to locate it is click on the ‘Find it at CSU’ link. We should then get another link appearing that we can follow through to that particular journal database and then we’ll be able
to see that article. So we’ve got that appearing on the screen and to access the full text just click on the PDF link. We’ll head back to the CSU student Library homepage now. You’ll also note on this page we’ve got lots of information about our borrowing services. So we’ve got information here on how to
avoid fines. You’ll find information in the borrowing services page about how
many items you can borrow at a time and how long for. So you can see here for Undergraduate students up to 20 items for four weeks is the standard loan period and there it gives you information about how often you can renew the book, loans as well. You’ll also find information there on how to avoid fines. So the library does charge fines on overduel items so do keep a note of your due dates and try and get the
books back or renew them by the due date. There’s also information here about interlibrary loans and information for our partner institutions. The academic integrity and
referencing link I’ll leave you to explore this in your own time. I just will
point out the referencing information that might be useful for you. Now we’ve got the link to referencing information here but keep in mind the Library does offer assistance in
referencing but it’s limited. The experts in referencing are actually the learning
support staff, they’re called the ALLaN advisers. So they’re the guys that you can contact for assistance with referencing but some of these tools are really useful for you. There’s the guide to APA referencing and also this academic referencing too that’s very useful. I’ll just
show you that here it’s got lots of examples in here for you so when you’re
doing your referencing for your assignment and you’re wondering how to reference a particular item just click
on the style and that would be APA6 for most CSU students, the type of item that you’re trying to reference, and
then narrow that down a little bit further using the options available and you’ll get some examples up on the screen.
So that’s a really useful tool. And as I mentioned it’s the learning support staff who are the experts in referencing. To access information about the learning support staff just go over to your study tab in the CSU student page and click on ‘learning support’. I believe they also do
run workshops on things like references so you might want to have a look at their page. Maybe have a look at the workshops link and then see how you can register for their workshops. Janine might be able to pop up a link to that page too if you’ve got time, Janine. Now I’m going to head back to the Library homepage. You’ll also not here there’s a link to our opening hours and then very importantly the link to Library help and contacts. So this is how you
can contact us for assistance using Library resources. Lots of different
options for you. If you are close to a campus at any time if you live close by
or you’re here for a residential school perhaps pop in and see us, we’d love to see you in person and we’ll be able to assist you using our Library resources. Or you can contact us by phone we have a 1-800 number that
you can use and we also have a live chat service so you’ll get instant
assistance during our operational hours using live chat or our phone number. If you
want to contact us out of hours you can use our web form or contact us via our Library skills forum. Just a note about our operational hours, during session time we manage phone and chat from 9am till 7pm
Mondays till Thursdays, and from 9am till 4:30pm on Fridays and Saturdays and
Sundays 1:30pm till 5pm. Heading back to the Library homepage again you’ll also notice here you can keep in touch with the Library via our social media channels. So
we’ve got Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and a blog. You can keep up to date with what’s
happening we provide study tips and we’ll give hints on where to find the best Library resources to
help you with your studies and you can also use our social media channels to
ask questions aswell, so you can get in touch with us via Facebook. That is pretty much all I
wanted to show you today. I hope this session has been helpful for you. Here in the Library
we do work very hard to make sure that you have access to the resources and the services
that will help you with your studies. If you need assistance at any time at all please get in touch with us that’s what we’re here for that’s our job. So any question big or small doesn’t matter get in touch and we’ll see what we can do to help you. Just a few notes before I finish if you’re interested in
learning more about for example journal databases or EndNote, why don’t you sign up for another one of of our Online Library Workshops and you can have a look at the
other workshops we’re running from our training tutorials and videos page,
Online Library Workshop, and there’s information about the workshops that we
may be running and a link to register. And just remember that today’s
workshop has been recorded and the recording will be emailed out all of you
to all registered participants.

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