PressbooksEDU webinar for MOBIUS

PressbooksEDU webinar for MOBIUS


I’m the e-resources coordinator over here. We are excited to be partnering with PressbooksEDU
to offer a 30% discount to MOBIUS members on their silver and gold subscription plans. And today, we have Liz Mays and Taylor McGrath
from Pressbooks to talk a little bit about the platform and the benefits of subscription
and give you an overview of how it works and what you’re able to get through this offer. Wonderful, thank you so much, Christina for
that introduction. And I just wanted to mention that we had talked
just prior to the call, some people had asked us to record this. So, we are doing that now. If anyone would like their piece scrubbed
from the recording, let me know after the call. And feel free at any time to put any questions
in the chat, I believe my colleague, Taylor, will be monitoring that and raising any questions
as I go along. And I really appreciate this opportunity to
show you what PressbooksEDU is all about. So, I guess without further ado, I will start
to share my screen and show you what I can do. I am going to find the right screen, hold
on. Does everyone see a red dashboard? Great, fantastic, okay. So, I have a few windows loaded up here, and
I’m actually going to start with this one. This is the homepage of a PressbooksEDU network. This happens to be UC Berkeley’s PressbooksEDU
network. And as you can see, they’ve been able to customize
the look of it, to fit their institution. So, they have put their logo up, they’ve used
a background image that suits their program. They have changed the copy for the title of
their program, and the subtitle and then, they’ve used the blocks in various ways on
the homepage. Another example is University of Saskatchewan,
and you can see that their network looks similar but different, again, with their branding,
their colors, their logo, their background image, using the blocks in different ways. And then, they’ve also made use of the carousel
catalog on the network homepage. And if you go to the complete catalog, you’ll
see a range of works that they’ve done in the year or so that they’ve had this system. To get a book into the catalog, it would need
to be public, but just having your book be public doesn’t necessarily put it in the catalog. So, the catalog can be a more curated selection
of the books that you’ve produced on your network. An example of how that might be used is we
have some schools where they are using the networks for a variety of different use cases. And in some cases, the books get a heavier
level of university and institutional vetting and support. And in some cases, those are the books that
end up in the catalog, whereas other faculty may also be able to use the system for different
course materials or projects. But some of those may or may not end up in
the catalog. And different institutions use this however
they would like to use it, but it is a feature that comes with the plan. What I’m going to show you next is what we
call a webbook. And this is a digital online version of a
public book that was built on a PressbooksEDU network, in this case Rebus Community’s network. And you can see that it has a title and a
description and attribution of who worked on it. Also, the license information and several
ways to read the book, both online and in other ways. What’s nice about our PressbooksEDU systems
is they allow you to showcase the book in a variety of export formats on the homepage
if you choose to use this feature. And this can be really nice for instance if
you have students who might be offline or potentially in rural areas or traveling on
an airplane, they can access some offline reading versions of the books, such as the
PDFs or they could download a copy for their e-reader if that’s something they wanted to
do. Other people could take some of these more
open formats and remix the book, regardless of whether they had a Pressbooks network. So, surfacing these exports is a really nice
feature for students and others. You can also read the book online and it is
mobile responsive, which is really nice. We hear a lot about students wanting to read
their textbook or their course materials on their cellphone, and you can completely do
that with a book built on Pressbooks. Lots of ways to navigate the book, you can
use the next buttons, you can navigate from the table of contents. And you can see a variety of ways where you
can navigate this in succession or jump around in the book and scroll down, this is what
we would call a chapter, for example. So, after showing you the basis of what that
looks like, I’m going to take you inside a network, this happens to be just our own demo
network. This is not a client network, so I’m inside
of this, and I’m going to use it to show you first the basics of creating a book or
an OER on Pressbooks. And then, some of the more fun, educational
features that you can utilize with Pressbooks. So, the first thing you would do if you’re
wanting to create a book is you would click create a new book. And I’m just going to call this… And I’m going to work on this privately. You have the option in Pressbooks to work
on a book privately, to work on it publicly, or to make the book public, but then make
different parts of it private. And that can be really handy for instance
if you are an instructor and you’re creating a book that you know you’re going to add to
every semester, where maybe you have most of the chapters that you’re using that semester
are live. And then, you’re still maybe working on the
one for the 15th week of that module, or maybe you know you’re going to release some more
material for the coming semester. You can still be working on that as you go
along. So, I’ve just created the book, and it’s going
to take me now to a dashboard that probably looks somewhat like WordPress, Pressbooks
is a heavily customized app built on WordPress, so a lot of this will look familiar. In Pressbooks, instead of pages and posts
we have what we call parts and chapters, but you can give them different terminology if
you want. So, for instance, this is a part and then
chapters sit within parts. So, I can edit these and create more of them. One thing I typically try to do is to structure
the book ahead of time, although you can do it as you go. But I might say module one, for instance,
and then going back to my dashboard I can add another part, so we’ll call that module
two. You might make these thematic for instance,
they don’t have to be numbered like this, but this is for the purposes of demonstration. And then, let’s say we have a chapter one,
so let me add another chapter. And then, my text would be here in the visual
editor, you can always go into the text editor to see the code behind what you’re typing
in case there’s something you want to start customizing. I just press create. And then, I can also move these around, so
what’s nice is as I am structuring the book if I make decisions and realize this actually
fits better in module two, I can just drag and drop or use the move up and move down
keys to do that. Another thing I might do at the outset of
creating a book or an OER is I would add the metadata, and there are different pieces to
that, and you can use whichever ones are appropriate for your use case here. You can add a title, subtitle, short title,
you can create and add new contributors, even people who do not have access to the system. So, this could be handy for instance in adding
a faculty member who isn’t necessarily interested in having access to the technology but is
still working on for instance an OER at your institution. So, now that I’ve created that contributor,
they’re here for me to choose from. For instance, if you were creating a book
for a faculty that assures that you won’t be named as the author or something accidentally. You can also credit a variety of other types
of contributors, that you might have on any book or OER. And this is a more general field for those
who might not fit these categories above. You would also be able to indicate the publisher,
the city, publication date, things like your ISBNs, or your DOI if you have it. You can add a cover for the ebook and the
webbook here. And then, categorize your book if you’d like
to. Probably the most important thing is the copyright
area and the licensing area. Of course, here you can indicate who owns
the copyright, but more important here you can tell Pressbooks what the license on this
book is. And so, one of the key features of Pressbooks
is that it enables you technologically to actually utilize the permissions that these
different Creative Commons licenses might grant. So, whatever you select here, and we do support
the full range of licenses. So, you can create all rights reserved content,
you can create public domain content, or any of the Creative Commons licenses or CC0. But whatever you choose here is going to tell
Pressbooks whether that book is cloneable by another system. So, if you like the OER you’re creating to
be broadly usable and replicable and remixable by others who are doing similar work at different
institutions, and you choose one of these licenses, Pressbooks will know oh I can let… For instance Ohio State sees your book and
says, “Wow, I’m going to pull that for my classroom as well. And I’m going to adapt it.” If it were licensed in a way where that is
permissible, and they happen to have a Pressbooks network, they can instantly clone an editable
version of that book. And so, this is really the setting that tells
Pressbooks whether that’s possible or not. So, I’ll CC BY and I’ll say that. Jumping ahead, pretending that we’ve set up
an entire book here, what you would do is you would choose what you want your book to
look like. So, we have about 20 different themes to choose
from and they work very similarly to applying a theme in WordPress. You just choose the theme you like, and you
activate it, and then, when you’re ready to preview the book or if you were ready to export
your files for publication, then you go to the export screen and those changes will be
reflected. So, for instance here I can choose any of
these formats to create exports of. It’s really up to me, I can choose all of
them, I can choose some of them. I’ll just choose this one for now and click
export. And you can see I get a little bit of a progress
bar to show me how that’s going. And then, the exports will appear for download
here. And once something has exported, I can take
that, and I can do whatever I want with it. So, I could for instance put this EPUB in
an ebookstore somewhere. You could easily take the PDF, it’s really
designed for print-on-demand. You could take that to your bookstore for
printing. You could take it to IngramSpark or Lulu or
other print-on-demand vendors you might use. In particular, the common cartridge 1.1 export
is a format that will show up on PressbooksEDU silver plans. And then, the common cartridge 1.3 with LTI
links will show up on PressbooksEDU gold plans. And these will help you take the book into
your learning management system with varying degrees of seamlessness, depending on your
plan. So, there is also a button to choose whether
or not to showcase the latest versions of these exports on your book homepage. So, like I showed you if you mark that setting
yes, you will essentially see those exports show up here, whichever you’ve selected to
show. So, that is the basics of creating a book
or an OER in Pressbooks. One other thing I’ll show just on this note
is Theme Options. So, you may have a theme you like, but you
want to customize something about it, maybe it’s the colors of the textboxes or something
like that. A lot of things we have surfaced in a way
where you wouldn’t need to get into CSS or code to make those types of minor customizations. So, here are a lot of different choices you
can make about your book layout, without going into the code. There are options that apply to all the formats,
which are the Global Options. There are Web Options that apply to that webbook
I had shown you. There are PDF Options, probably the most important
of which is the trim size. But you can also, if you want to, get into
customizing things like the margins and the footers and the running heads. And then, Ebook Options, which include things
like compressing your images. Essentially, what happens here that’s really
nice in Pressbooks is that since you’re creating these from a single source, whenever you change
these Theme Options and save those changes, Pressbooks is going to automatically reflow
your manuscript. And so, there’s no page by page finagling
of things to look right again, Pressbooks just automatically makes all the formats look
right. And that is extra nice, because you’re not
having to do those changes manually in multiple formats either. So, I’m actually going to, I’ve lost my chat
window, and I’m going to pause really quick to see if there are any questions in the chat
or Taylor, maybe I’ll ask you. There are not any questions in the chat yet. Okay. Feel free to send some. Yeah, okay. So, I will then move on to some of the more
educational features and cool things that you can do with an education specific book. For that, I’m going to go into a book that’s
already pre-setup to showcase some of these features for you. And so, one of the things I think is really
fun is the glossary feature and you can use that in a variety of ways. I see maybe do I see… I think I see something in the chat. Yes, what capabilities does Pressbooks provide
through LTI? Great question. And I will actually be sure to include some
time to demonstrate these. There are a few things you can do. Essentially, you can take those exports with
the weblinks and you can include essentially an embedded link to chapters of the book in
your course. The more seamless integration is the full
LTI integration, which will essentially take a Pressbooks book and that will enable it
to look very seamless in the LMS. And so, when you bring it in that way with
the full integration, what will happen is that Canvas or whatever your LMS happens to
be will break the book up into different chapters, really forming like a spine of your course
in the LMS. It will also sync, so if you do any changes
on the Pressbooks side, those will instantly appear inside as though they’re inside the
interface. Another thing that is nice is it removes the
Pressbooks navigation around the book, in your LMS. So, there’s no chance of students getting
confused or having to click an external link to go outside of the LMS. It really keeps the students in the LMS and
feeling like they’re in the LMS. So, there’s a couple of benefits to that,
and I promise I will actually do like a little demo of that toward the end of this presentation. Great question. Super, okay. So, speaking back to the glossary term, I
will show you what this looks like in practice. Pressbooks can help you create glossary terms
inside the text and then an auto generated glossary from those terms. So, for instance, this is a glossary term
in a webbook and when I click on it, it essentially brings a definition down for me. So, how was that made? I can go into this chapter, looking for the
Edit button here. Scrolling all the way down, sorry about that. And you’ll see that there is a short code
around that term, but I didn’t personally have to come up with that short code or think
about that short code. So, let me remove this to show you how that
gets there. So, basically, let’s assume that I want to
make this a glossary term. So, I highlight the term and I click this
GL in the visual editor menu. I could either create and insert a term, or
I could choose an existing term. This term happens to exist in the book, so
I’m going to insert it. And as you’ll see, Pressbooks added the short
code to tell Pressbooks this is a glossary term, treat it like a glossary term. So, then I’ll save my changes and then, that
term will be back in the chapter. Another way I could this, is I could go to
glossary terms, and I could add a new glossary term. And for the sake of demonstration here, I’m
going to create that. Moving my own window off here. Okay. And another thing that’s important is this
checkbox, so when I created that I checked this box, which will determine whether or
not this term shows up in an auto generated glossary. So, if I want to auto generate a glossary
from all the terms I’ve created in the book in any method, all I would need to do is go
to add a piece of back matter. And I can call this anything I want, so I
will just call it new glossary. And I just leave this blank, but I tell Pressbooks
that the type of this back matter item is glossary. And then, I press create, and you can see
it’s blank in the visual editor. And then, Pressbooks will auto populate that
glossary with the terms that had the checkbox to show them in this auto populated glossary. And you will see that our new term is in here. Another thing that I think is a nice interactive
element is called H5P. And what that does is it allows you to create,
actually 40 different types of interactives. The most useful of which I think are things
like quizzes, for formative assessment. So, your students can be reading your textbook
and then you go through and there is a point at which you want them to test themselves
on what they’ve learned. You can do that with for instance a multiple-choice
quiz question. You can also do it with the drag the words
or identify the verbs or different things they offer. And the way to create those is you just select
H5P and this was pre-activated on the network. But all you would have to do is just press
the yes, activate this on the network. And then, excuse me, activate this on the
book. And once you’ve activated it, these types
of options will appear to you. So, I would just write my question here, my
answer, let’s call that answer one as correct. And then, this is more of the question, metadata,
and then I’m going to create this quiz. And you’ll see that a short code appears here,
so I can take that, and I can put that anywhere in the book. And then, it will show that quiz in the webbook. So, let’s say I want to add that quiz in the
middle of this chapter, I can add it anywhere I want, let’s just put it right here. I’ll save that and then, when I go to the
book, you’ll see that it’s included this. So, I can take that, I can retry, and these
can also be reused or embedded or different things. I think probably the best live example of
this is this Portuguese open textbook that was built at the University of Wisconsin Madison. When you look at it, the way they’ve structured
it is they have lessons, and then they have dialogues. And in the dialogue, they include a lot of
these interactive elements. So, first they’ve embedded an audio clip that
you can listen to, that has dialogue. And then, they have put the text of that dialogue
after the audio clip. And then, they also have some quizzes on this. So, I will choose this, I am wrong. Okay. And then, they’ve also used some of the other
H5P interactives. So, here you might mark all of the conjugated
forms of the verb and however you might want to do, and then you can check your results
again. And retry of course. They use this throughout the book in different
ways, but that gives you an example of some of the possibilities for a tool like this. Another thing that is nice is the textbox
feature. So, a lot of times you want your book not
to be too texty, you want to make sure that students can scan through the book pretty
easily. And don’t get stuck or too buried in too dense
of a passage of text. So, I like to use the textboxes a lot. And here’s an example of what some of these
look like. We have a variety of pre-built formats that
you can use. And then, in the Theme Options I showed you,
in most themes you can customize for instance the colors of these, which gives you an added
layer to make it your own. And these are pretty easy to insert, so going
into this chapter with bunches of textboxes, I am going to scroll down until I find a place
to put my cursor. And then, I’ll just use here we go I will
just use the textbox dropdown to insert my favorite types of textboxes. I really like these. And then, you can of course edit all of these
things within the textbox as well. You can also embed things like video or similar
things. There are some interactives called PhET Simulations,
where we have made it possible to essentially include a link to a PhET simulation. And that can be used inside your book as well. A similar thing we’ve done, which I don’t
have loaded up here is the Knight timeline, out of I believe it’s MIT Lab. They have a really nice timeline thing that
they have built, and you can embed timelines in Pressbooks using that tool. Another thing that you can do is include video
in your textbook or embed video. So, here is what that would look like on a
webbook. And again, you can do this in between different
passages of text. This is just an example. And that’s done pretty simply, you just include
the URL to the video on YouTube or Vimeo or someplace similar. We have about 20 different places that are
whitelisted, and if there is something else that you use at your university like Kaltura
or something else, that’s something we can whitelist on a case by case basis. If you looked at the text editor, you’d see
that all I had to insert was the link to the YouTube video. So, if I do that, it just becomes like an
embed here. And I’m going to pause again there and see
if we have any questions in the chat. Thanks for that, Taylor. No problem, no questions so far. I did want to mention that you can also add
H5P directly from the editor, you see the button above the visual editor by the add
media button? So, you don’t always have to just paste the
short code over from that. That’s a really good point, thank you. Yeah, you can do it while you’re in there. Guy says, “What export formats can display
H5P or media? So, that would be the webbook and the webbook
in any other format, like in an LMS. The other exported formats don’t handle interactive
elements, but we have graceful fallbacks for those. So, that when you put in H5P elements or you
put in videos, there will be a link to that content that the student can click to go to. Yes, and it just is like a little placeholder
with the link. Another question was how do the interactive
components translate into portable print formats? Right, so they designed those little boxes
that will refer a student directly to that piece of content in a digital format. If it’s a digital PDF, or an ebook that link
will exist. If it’s a print PDF, they’ll just have to
type in the link or copy paste it, if they’re looking at it on a screen still. But there’s always a signal that there was
content there and what the content was and how to get to it. Definitely. Okay. So, we will stay tuned for more chat questions. And in the meantime, I guess I will show a
little bit about the LTI integration with the caveat that I actually don’t have access
to a university’s LMS that has this enabled. So, I’m using essentially a demonstration
instance of Canvas. So, there are just one or two discrepancies
there, but I will explain that in a second. So, here I’m logged in as a network manager. Again, to this demo site, so this is essentially
not belonging to any institution. But this is setup where it would have the
LTI integration like a gold system would have. And to use that, I go to LTI consumers under
integrations, and I can create a new LTI connection. So, if this were for instance a university
network, you might have multiple LMSs in use. And here is where you would create different
connections to those. So, I might call this Moodle connection or
something like that. And then, I would make up a name for the key
here, and you’ll see there’s a secret generated. I enable it, I protect it, and then I save
the changes, which I’m not actually going to do here. But that’s how the connection itself is built. Then, if I want to pull content from a network
that has the connection to their LMS, I can do that. Hold on, I would need to first take an export. So, I’ll use this book here. So, if the LTI integration is enacted on your
network, if you have a gold network, you will see this option here. And this is the option that will give you
the most seamless LTI integration. So, what I do is I take an export of that
book, which I had done just a little bit earlier as well, so I’ve already downloaded this to
my computer. And then, I have uploaded it into oh goodness,
I’ve lost my Canvas window. Into Canvas, hold on, just a moment. Let me pull up. In the meantime, there’s a question does the
LTI need to be at the course level in Canvas? Or can we put it in at the account or enterprise
level? Right, if you have the connection, you’d probably
be putting it in at the account enterprise level. Normally, the individual faculty would not
have access to the screen I just showed you. So, with each network you would have a certain
number of support contacts who are what we call network managers. They typically don’t need to do anything technical
necessarily, but they would be the ones to give that code, this key and secret pair to
the IT team that has that access at the account enterprise level to whatever learning management
systems you have in play. In theory, they could authorize it at the
course level, as long as the connection is there on your network. I have heard of people doing that. But generally, most people are going to use
it at the account enterprise level. So, I’ve created a course, which I’ve called
demo three. And this is an example where I have imported
the content that I just exported. And the way that I did that was I went to
Settings and Import Course Content. And this gives me
a screen where I can select the common cartridge package and then, I have pre-downloaded to
my desktop this particular book that I just exported. And then, I’m going to choose to import all
content and click import there. And what will happen you can see I did this
just a little while ago, it will say there is one issue to address. And then, I’ll address that in the Settings
field. Or maybe it won’t say there’s an issue, because
I’ve already done that on this book. But I would then go to Settings and App Configurations
and I would look, this comes up because I uploaded that content. And here’s where I can edit things like the
key, the secret, the domain would be from the particular network in question. I would make this public and then, I would
press submit. And then, that content will show up in the
demo book. So, I have a couple of different examples
of what this looks like. I’m going to go to demo two. So, for instance, this is that book which
I’ve pre-loaded into this Canvas instance. And then, what I’ve done is I’ve created different
activities around it. So, I’ve used this book as the spine of my
semesterly course. So, each part might become a module in Canvas,
and then each chapter has become a page here in Canvas. And I of course, can make these public or
private to the students. And then, I can also add other things around
them, so here I’ve added a discussion using discussion board. Here, I’ve added an exercise, there are a
couple of other, here’s an assignment. Earlier in the book, I’ve added a quiz. And so, you can of course move things around
in the LMS as well. This will look just a smidge different than
it will with a real university system of Canvas. This is again a free demo instance of Canvas
and one thing I have not been able to get rid of is the scroll bar, which shouldn’t
actually show using the real integration. But you can see this essentially keeps students
reading this content or engaging with this content inside the interface. And what you see here is actually the navigation
from Canvas, so the Pressbooks navigation is not there, is not confusing. Another thing that this will do is if you
do have Hypothesis on a chapter, for instance let me pick a chapter that does have it on
there. I think there’s some in here. Sorry about that. You also have the option of viewing the Hypothesis
annotations in this window as well. So, let’s see if there are any public annotations. If there were annotations on this particular
chapter, they would show here. You can view Hypothesis is available to enable
on Pressbooks for you, at a per book level. So, different faculty might or might not want
that option. But you can enable it on parts of your book,
on all of your book. And you can dictate at a very granular level
where you want the annotation option to appear. So, one thing you might do with that is for
instance utilize that for a deeper, more meaningful discussion. So, instead of just having a book that is
sort of a static object that students are expected to consume, you can have that book
be a two-way conversation of students to students, commenting on the book, reflecting on their
reactions to the book. Discussing aspects of the book, as a faculty
member, you can join in that conversation. You can be having conversations with the authors
and editors of that book and then with the public at large. So, it enables these multi-directional conversations. A good example, let me find one where I absolutely
know there are some annotations on here. You’ll see that they show up here as highlighted
areas. And when I open the Hypothesis window, I can
then click on these annotations and read what other people have said. What’s also nice about Hypothesis which is
again like a plugin that we have enabled, is that you can also have in addition to just
public conversations, you can set up on the Hypothesis side private conversations or private
groups and you can invite the students to those groups. So, you could instruct your students to comment
in a private discussion channel using that tool as well. Another thing that people are using the LTI
connection for is occasionally they might be using Pressbooks to create a course reader
of copyrighted content, which really shouldn’t be public on the web. You can enable with the LTI the full integration,
you can have the book be private on Pressbooks and then have it still show up to students
in the LMS. So, that is another benefit to using it in
that way. Liz? Yes. There is a question, there are no capabilities
to create graded H5P assignments in Pressbooks and then pass the results to Canvas, are there,
at this time? No, at this time, there are not. That is a feature that we do plan to develop. It will be a separate product, it will not
be part of the silver or gold plan, but it is on our roadmap as soon as possible. So, it’s something we’re talking about many,
many people who’ve expressed interest in Pressbooks or who are current clients that is something
they are wanting us to add. So, I have pretty good confidence that at
some point that will be available but again, it will be a separate feature. Okay, that was it. Okay, great. Well, I think I’m going to pause there, and
I’m actually going to ask you, Taylor, what have I forgotten? Because we have some extra time. Oh man, put on the spot like that. I think you covered all the coolest stuff. Okay. Great, so I guess I will encourage some more
questions and go from there. Normally this takes me a little closer to
an hour, so I hope I haven’t talked too fast. Christina, was there anything you specifically
wanted me to address that I haven’t touched on yet? I think you’ve covered everything I expected
to be covered. Great. I can maybe speak to a couple other features. Great. So, one is that if there are people who are
working on these books that are more comfortable working in Markdown, we’ve recently made a
plugin available. You can turn on a Markdown editor and create
your books in Markdown, Berkeley uses that a lot. I think it’s more compatible if you’re coming
from say GitBooks or something and you’re used to drafting on different platforms. There’s of course MathJax, which we just released
in Quick LaTeX, so people creating STEM textbooks will be working a lot with that kind of stuff. We recently added the MathJax feature to our
lineup to increase the accessibility of this math rendering mark up and let you do math
equations that weren’t just in LaTeX but also in MathML and AsciiMath. There’s also we did recently do a thorough
backend administrative evaluation of all of the pieces that you’re seeing here. All of the pages that help you make your book
all of those are as close to 100% accessible as we can get them. And we’re working with other pieces of software
and trying to get all of that as accessible as possible for our users. There is a bunch of language capabilities,
I know she showed you the Portuguese book earlier. There’s different levels of language that
interchange throughout Pressbooks. You can set the metadata language for your
book, but you can also set a separate language for your interface. We have recently got 100% French translation
on our Pressbooks platform, so we’re 100% in both French and English. And those are constantly growing translation
levels as well from our community. We’re also compatible with the Zotero citations
tool, anybody using Zotero can grab a webbook’s metadata and keep that in their citations. Somebody says, “Could you show the MathJax
so we can see what it’s like, Liz?” Yeah, I saw that, and Taylor, where do I find
that nowadays? Goodness, so if you have Quick LaTeX turned
off, you should be able to find it in your settings. Okay, great, let’s find out if I have Quick
LaTeX turned off. Yes, MathJax is right there. Okay, perfect. Okay. True confessions, I don’t do a lot of STEM
textbooks in Pressbooks. So, what would a person do if they were here? They would just change these settings, Taylor,
to their liking, for their MathJax output? Sorry, yeah, so you’ve got the syntaxes listed
here that MathJax is compatible with, LaTeX, AsciiMath, and MathML. There aren’t too many settings right now,
we’re still developing a couple of them. This is stuff we just released this last week,
so don’t blame us for not being so skilled on that. (Laughter) So, you can set the text color,
and you can also set a couple of different fonts. And so, the cool thing about this is that
when you generate math, and maybe I can take over. Would it be better if I screen shared for
this? Yeah, I think that would be great. Okay. So, I’ll stop sharing. That’s fine. And while you’re setting that up, I’m going
to address another question in the chat. The accessibility capabilities, so essentially,
we do have a VPAT as Taylor mentioned that is available on our website. That is mainly for the interface for the creators. I think what you’re asking about right here
is do we force people to essentially create content that will be accessible? The short answer is no, it will not force
you to use things like headers and the right colors and put alt text into your images and
all of those things you should do to build any content, anywhere that is educational
and accessible. However, there are some resources built in
the ecosystem about creating accessible content in that way. And that is something that we address as part
of any of the plans we do trainings not only with your support contacts, but also with
your users. And that’s a thing that we would mention of
course, here’s how to make sure that your content is accessible to people when you’re
building that in Pressbooks. And then, I’m going to put another resource
in the chat, which is the BCCampus is a heavy user of Pressbooks, and they’ve created an
open textbook accessibility toolkit of how to make books accessible in Pressbooks. So, I’ll post that here as well. And Taylor, I realized I didn’t demonstrate
cloning either. There okay, can people see my screen? Yes. Okay, great. All right, so this is MathJax settings page,
again, you’ve got all of these syntaxes. I’m just going to grab straight from the examples
here. Okay. I’m
going to create myself a new chapter. So, I put in the LaTeX short codes, that’s
one of the syntaxes that’s compatible here. And the equation inside of it, and I’ll go
ahead and create this. And I’m going to show you the webbook, because
while the SVGs look great in the export formats, the great part of MathJax comes into play
in the webbook version of this. Because you have all of these options that
comes with MathJax that make it accessible and allow the user, the reader to be able
to see it in different ways. So, you can see how to convert it into different
math syntaxes if you’re creating other open textbooks so it’s accessible and open in that
way. You can also enable other accessibility features. So, let’s say I want to zoom this into 300%
whenever I’m hovering, and I can set that for an entire book. And then, whenever I hover, it’ll blow it
up to that size. And then, you have all of the languages for
the admin that come with MathJax as well as these other accessibility features and the
things that allow you to change the background and the foreground and the colors. Anything that makes it better for you to read
through the book. And again, there are scalable vector graphics,
so no matter what size they are in your ebooks and your PDFs, they’re always going to look
great. So, that’s how the MathJax works. Unfortunately, I’m not super adept at AsciiMath
or MathML or I’d throw some of that up there for you pretty quickly too. Did you want me to go ahead and go through
cloning, Liz? Yeah, go ahead while you’re in there. Okay, all right, let’s find a book. Making Open Textbooks with Students from the
Rebus Community is a CC BY book. And I can check there and see that the copyright
allows me to create copies. Then, this is on a Pressbooks network, so
all I need to do is grab that URL and then I will go back into my textbook and from any
admin page on Pressbooks you just have to go to My Catalog and clone a book. Put in your source book URL, I will say that
I want this URL to be Making Open Textbooks One, because I’ve probably already cloned
this before. And I’ll customize my title there and clone
the book. So, another thing about the nuances of the
copyright levels here is that you can actually set CC BY licenses, any Creative Commons or
all rights reserved license at a chapter level. So, say a Guide to Making Open Textbooks with
Students is a CC BY book, I can clone that, but say there’s one chapter that is all rights
reserved, that they want it to remain protected by that. Then, that chapter would not clone, when you
took the rest of the book in. So, we’ll check here, the progress bar says
we’re good. And then, we’ve got our fully cloned book
with 47 glossary terms, two front matter, five parts, etc. And here we are. And we can go and visit our cloned book. And so, you can clone a book from any Pressbooks
network as long as it is public, and it has an open license that allows derivatives. I’m going to go ahead and stop sharing. Great. And I will just add to that there’s a couple
of different ways that you can use that that might be useful. You can use it to create just a clone to adopt,
you can use it to create an editable version that you’re going to for instance remove some
chapters, add other chapters, make edits inside the text. You can do all of those things if you’re adopting
and remixing a book. Another way that we’ve seen people use this
is to make a master clone of a textbook that is fairly well established as an open textbook. But maybe an entire department is planning
to adopt that textbook, so from the master clone for that university they may make 20
copies on their network and hand control of one copy to each of the faculty that teach
that subject at the university. And that enables the faculty not to have to
come to complete consensus on exactly how the textbook should be adapted, it allows
them to localize the examples to the way they teach. It allows them to rearrange the content, if
they teach things in a different order for instance. Or to just make minor edits that they may
just feel are absolutely crucial. So, having that cloning feature becomes a
way to incentivize remixing of OER, which is sometimes at the institutional level easier
to incentivize than starting from scratch and creating an OER, a full book by yourself. Taylor: Another thing I like is that any book
that has been cloned, the network that cloned it has the ability to turn on a book level
or a chapter level across the book comparison tool. So, if you’ve enabled that and you have made
changes to a book and you want people to be able to see those changes, you can have that
appear at the end of the book and people can go back and see okay, this is the difference
between the version I’m looking at and the version that exists in the original network. Great. So, I think we may have about covered it. I’m going to see, I see another question. I know you mentioned the LMS capabilities
but what other features are plan specific? That’s a great question. So, I’ll talk about that for just a moment. With the educational plans, the base plan,
what we call the silver plan includes the basics of what you would need to create OER
and educational content. So, that is the cloning tool, some of these
wonderful plugins we’ve talked about, like the H5P plugin, the Hypothesis plugin, MathJax,
another called TablePress for sophisticated table creation. Also, the integration with your university’s
Google Analytics account is possible on those plans as well. It also includes the thin common cartridge
exports with weblinks. So, all of that is included on the silver
plan as well as a layer of training for your support contacts as well as your users. And then, support for the designated support
contacts that you have designated to be the liaisons to Pressbooks. On the gold plan, that is really for instances
where the university wants a deeper integration with its existing infrastructure. So, with that you might be in need of the
full integration with your learning management system or systems in place at the university
and that’s something that we are glad to do with the gold plan. You also have the option to purchase for a
one-time configuration fee there is an SSO authentication option that is available to
purchase on the gold plan as well. So, generally, unless you need those university
integrations, the basic plan should have what you need. There’s also small differences in the amount
of storage for the different plans as well as trainings at this time. Yeah. Were there any other questions? I’ll give people just a moment. Well, I don’t see any other questions, so
I guess we can close up here. But if you do have other questions after this
event, please feel free to contact us. You can reach me at [email protected] and
please feel free to reach out, I’d be glad to sidebar with you individually or talk about
your individual needs at your institution or go deeper into any of this. So, I hope to hear from some of you on this
call. And it’s been a pleasure spending this hour
with you today. So, thank you again for your time. And it was nice to speak to some Missourians
again. Thank you both so much, this was great. Thanks, Christina.

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