Striving for Accessibility in Library Services

Striving for Accessibility in Library Services


so to begin and welcome to today’s webinar this is striving for accessibility in library services presented by Empire State Library council my name is Carolyn Bennett Glauda and I work at Southeastern New York library Resources Council which is the ESLN council representing New York’s Hudson Valley. Our presenter today is Nazely Kurkjian and she’s joining us from the State University of New York where she will be running the show here in a minute. Before we begin there are a few housekeeping notes. First and foremost if you are having any technical difficulties with the Adobe Connect meeting my colleagues Zack is here to help you he’s on the line now and he can assist you via email phone or chat This is a live interactive webinar and we encourage you to participate! The presenter and I are both using voice over IP to connect today and we hope that we’re coming in loud and clear. We are the only ones with audio enabled so if you have something to contribute please use the chat box if you’re not hearing this clearly and your speakers are set and on properly please let Zack know. Nazely, is that you on the line? yeah! Okay hi, I just got to make sure mike’s working hello I’m before we hand it over to you I just wanted to let everyone know that a way to participate in this webinar is by using the raise hand icon at any point you may use as the participation buttons such as agree for yes or disagree for know and applause if the mood strikes you will do our best to keep an eye out for raised hand so that you can participate and ask questions that you might have for the presenter i will also have a Q&A a dedicated Q&A time at the session at the end of the session and you may ask your questions in the chat box at any time during the webinar this webinar is being recorded so don’t worry if you need to step away or miss something we will do our best to have the full recording up and on our website this week and we will post it there on the site as well as send you a link to the email address that you used to register so now that we are all set let’s try the applause button to give a warm welcome to Nazely think and it’s all you you’re welcome ok i’m just uploading the presentation can everyone see this right okay hi everybody my name is Nazely Kurkjian and i’m the coordinator of disability diversity and non-traditional student services at SUNY system administration like to think Carolyn and the Empire State Library network for inviting me to speak and providing this webinar is such an important topic as Carolyn mention you know this will be available as a recording in addition to the presentation materials just some additional background information prior to my role at SUNY administration i was the adaptive technology specialist in the services for students with disabilities office at Binghamton University which is a SUNY doctoral institution in New York and there I worked to increase awareness of barriers to access and improve accessibility for our campus community i worked closely with the university libraries to ensure equal access to e reserves and partnered with them to monitor assistive technology access in the libraries that being said and this is my agenda for today and so i’ll begin with some key concepts and definitions briefly cover legal landscape provide an overview on access to electronic information and technologies and discuss some strategies for institutionalizing accessibility within your organization this presentation will cover information about improving services for patrons with disabilities this is not a technical how to webinar in the sense that i’m not teaching you step-by-step how to caption videos for example but i will provide how to resources and tools to accomplish accessibility I see a note that people aren’t hearing anything is that another ours are more people that cant hear me ok ok so it seems to be a single issue i’m going to continue and so I just want to do a quick side note i understand how the importance of accessibility for me is like copyright for you please know that if there are photos in this presentation that are not cited I assure you they are compliant with copyright law either created by me screenshots or through a website such as pixabay so before we begin I just would like to do a quick poll right what type of library do you work at academic public special law or other right it seems like a lot of people here are from academic libraries that’s great and welcome okay awesome that’s really good to know so i’m going to close this okay so obviously many of you are aware the way that libraries deliver content and services is dramatically changing and in this dynamic world libraries are discovering new ways to engage there’s an increase in digital trends needs and resources traditionally libraries have been seen as a place to consume knowledge whereas now there’s a shift to produce knowledge and that being said i would like to primarily focus on accessibility within the individual environment for this presentation to set the tone and I’d like to begin by briefly explaining the socio-cultural evolution of disability historically our attitudes towards disabilities in medical sense that is that it is abnormal or unhealthy and impairment is the issue society tends to act reactively in both academic and non-academic settings we typically wait individuals to self-identify in order to request information and services and then we provide accommodations well there’s a social and cultural transformation and how we view disability namely the social model of disability which emphasizes removing barriers from the environment that we put their this is a more inclusive and proactive way of thinking and we’ll set the tone for the remainder of this presentation the whole point is to design environments that are accessible and usable to all from the beginning some of you may be thinking of universal design as I say this this is a concept instead of inclusive design principles slight warning this is somewhat of a false dichotomy because accommodations are not going away and are still necessary in many cases we can strive to be as accessible as possible from the get-go this is just a cute little cartoon i wanted to share from the Ontario Human Rights Code and it provides various accessibility criteria and terminology that will cover through the presentation so what is accessible and basically it’s about our ability to engage and participate in the world around us on this definition that’s on the screen is from office of civil rights resolution agreement at the University of Montana and has been described in other resolution agreement that basically means that individuals with disabilities are able to acquire the same information engage in the same interactions at the same time frame with substantially equivalent ease-of-use accessible in regards to digital access means that one can access information with or without assistive technologies if you’re not familiar with assistive technologies assistive technologies are used by individuals with disabilities to access computers and digital information on these are a number of ways that people with disabilities access information and our environments and and many libraries provide assistive technology hardware software and apps some organizations provide assistive technologies on public computing PAP computing lab others have designated rooms for access by patrons with disabilities accessible alternative electronic formats also assist users with disabilities and accessing information this could be you know large large font Braille text-based PDF for audiobooks and alternate methods are on another way of providing information it’s kind of like an alternate format and this could be like closed captioning or audio descriptions two on two items that i really want you to know more about our screen readers and text-to-speech these terms a screen reader is a software that can navigate and read everything on the computer screen to you so I’m this kind of software is primarily used by people with visual impairments and I’m they use these technologies to access all aspects of the computer including programs the internet and if websites and e-readers and databases and etc are not properly structured and labeled then people using this software may not be able to access this information and text-to-speech is a component of a screen reader the screen reader is reading text out loud but text-to-speech software also benefits other individuals with print disabilities such as dyslexia so I’m basically if you have a word document you could use built-ins text-to-speech technology to have that text read out loud to do and some people are just our learners and so maybe they just want to listen instead of read actually I want to go back for one moment on something else I on a slide mostly talked about how people with disabilities access electronic information but another thing that you should think about when interacting with individuals with disabilities is how you’re going to communicate with them I’m and so you want to consider technology and other methods to communicate in person and this would include assistive listening units are for people who are hard of hearing or deaf or communication software and apps to communicate with deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals you may want to look into working with a video remote interpreting service in order to provide interpreting to individuals if you don’t have an interpreter readily available on staff these are existing accessibility resources and organizations whose primary mission is to serve the print disabled community you may already be familiar with these but just in case people ask for they’re looking for additional resources outside of the library on some of these resources are free some our fee-based some require proof of disability to access them and the resources range from audio books too accessible formats including electronic braille or text based PDS so why are we talking about this I will accessibility is a growing concern due to the increased complaints filed by individuals with print disabilities both an academic and non-academic enterprises and i just have the slide up to tell you I’m not a lawyer and please don’t use me as legal advice if you’re going to assess and right policy and process for accessibility related items you may want to include legal counsel in those conversations so many of you are here probably because you already know a little bit about accessibility or mildly familiar with why it’s important and the legal obligations that we have to provide services to this community and the rehabilitation act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act or a DA these are the guiding federal civil rights statutes that I’m it provide access and information about how we should be properly providing accommodations so and I just wanted to list these here for you i have the links for the specific laws at the end of this presentation and these are what you want to keep in mind as you set up our policies and procedures so I’m just to go into a few things a little bit section 508 is one that pertains to this discussion specifically like wait requires electronic and information technology to be accessible to individuals with disabilities and the new york state IT accessibility policy is a new york state policy that adopts parts of section 508 494 New York State and specifically mentions SUNY and CUNY public higher education systems i added the copyright act to this not because it mentions disability necessarily but there is a chaffee amendment which pretty much says that accessibility Trump’s copyright this was ran in 1996 and at the time and as it is written it is meant for published non-dramatic literary works everything else falls under fair use many of you already provide accommodations based on your Rico based on request and i wanted to provide some examples and this is some of the wording that they’ve found on web sites for library associations and agencies so basically bada requires institutions to provide reasonable accommodations what is reasonable you may be wondering I’m something that is reasonable well would be something like you know a student with a print disability needs physical print resource and they needed an accessible electronic format in order to access the materials that other students without disabilities can access this is not a substantial alteration to the delivery of this opportunity and so this is reasonable other reasonable accommodations may include providing assistive technology or making print materials available in other formats and other accommodations can be interpreters or live captioning Services or video remote interpreting and for services libraries may provide individuals with extended loan periods or reserve periods books by mail or you know remote access to electronic resources volunteer leaders in the library that kind of thing so what is unreasonable then and something that would be constituted as unreasonable maybe a student coming to the library and wishes to have additional time to read materials in a closed reserve so this would likely result in the library you know opening an extra past hour or so past the closing time and this would be as a substantial alteration in the manner in which the library delivers this its services and so this would be designated as something unreasonable sum when assessing undue financial burden the government will look at the total resources available in the situation and so if you are an institution of the state they will look at the budget of the state and these are just some examples of relevant legal action as it pertains to libraries so happy trust is a landmark copyright lawsuit I’m sure all of you are very well aware of it but it’s really important because you as librarians can retain copies under fair use share copies with other print disabled individuals and is vendors and publishers do not provide accessible formats libraries can make those resources accessible so basically accessibility providing accessible digital content to readers with disabilities does not violate copyright copyright law and is fair use and others to mention the Free Library of Philadelphia and Sacramento Public Library’s and they were in and lawsuits over inaccessible ereader devices specifically the nook and the note is not the only an accessible ereader device but it is what these libraries happen to be using they were using these readers in a patron lending program and the government pretty much said you can acquire any more inaccessible readers for patron use and you have to buy more successful readers and then the University of Montana and pennsylvania state university and berkeley and those had some emphasis on access to library services specifically inaccessible library databases so let’s move on to technical standards for providing it for providing to accessible digital environments so their section 508 as i mentioned before and the web content accessibility guidelines or it’s known as weekend section 5 away as it stands right now only applies to federal entities some states have adopted section 508 further state some colleges use section 508 to assess technical accessibility and section 508 is outdated and really we should be looking at the wick had to point owa guidelines as the baseline for access quick AG is an international standard there’s three levels there’s a double-a and triple-a and in order of levels of accessibility and the courts keep on endorsing wick had to point out double-a as the baseline stand for standard in fact and the associated which Association anyways so the association of research libraries I believe their policy was to include was endorsing wick had to point owa guidelines as the standard and so i’m going to go over some accessibility criterion of the standard so this standard is pretty much about design and design elements can limit accessibility greatly and basically you want to ensure that graphic and video content is accessible to people who can’t see it audio content is accessible to people who can’t hear it and electronic information technologies can be controlled and manipulated by assistive technology and information maybe access remotely so when you’re when you’re digitizing content or creating Lib guides or tutorials electronic reserves or even designing exhibits keep all these and design elements in mind and the categories of disability such as so how will this impact on people with mobile visit mobile disabilities or cognitive impairments or auditory and visual disabilities and these are some of the items that you want to consider accessible design principles apply broadly and so submit for many of these things they apply very broadly like color and structure and and so and additionally for these items you want to consider not only the accessibility of the content itself but the platform and the device i can’t cover all of these today but i will provide resources so let’s begin with websites so web accessibility includes several components the website itself the content within the website the browser’s the media players and then you know whatever additional applets plugins the database platforms you know third-party products and services and basically all of these require appropriate structure by use of headings and proper labels like the buttons the form filled the drop-down menus are you want to make sure that navigation is clear and consistent you want to avoid time-based access and avoid distracting changing and unorganized interfaces the easiest way without using assistive technology for you as you know someone just playing around on a computer to gauge if a screen reader user can navigate a website is to click the tab button when you click the tab button you will see either and there will be a box that shows up where it is clicking where it is moving to or at the bottom of the browser you will see where it is going and so you can see how someone with a screen reader will navigate this website and you can you know it’s like how you read a newspaper but you wanted to read in the order that we visually see it which is how we want a screen reader to navigate web pages and documents your organization may have hundreds of web pages in in striving to be more accessible i highly recommend prioritizing websites facing the public and prioritize content accessibility of content based on high-interest most accessed core supports these kinds of things to get a little more degree here I’m here are some examples of hyperlink accessibility and the barrier for hyperlinks is vague display text or link titles that are descriptive or there too long and so the accessibility criteria is to have meaningful hyperlinks descriptive and make sense when out of context this is important because and you know when people with screen readers for or anyone really are navigating the website they want to know where they’re clicking too and so if you write things like click here or if you have a really long hyperlink people don’t know where they’re going I’m and so it’s important to provide this information so that you know the user knows that that is the link that they want to actually click some of you may like to make your lip guides and flyers really pretty and interesting i promise you you don’t have to sacrifice beauty in order to be accessible just try to provide sufficient color contrast and try not to use color to convey meaning alone and there are plenty of free tools online that analyzed contrast ratios and and for entire web pages or in you know in documents and such so i will provide those resources to you for images tables and graphs on the biggest barrier is no description so and when people I you know how when you have her over a picture on a website and there’s text and it and it means something and says like students doing interviews for class that is an alternate text description alt tag it is a code attached to the image that lives within the image so when you download an image off the internet typically there’s some kind of gibberish attached to it like dot jpg 12345 what you want to do is modify that description to enable people using screen readers or even people not using screen readers to better understand the image and literally access the image for some and so and this is built into most programs the image on the screen is a screenshot from on the update website template and so they provide the ability to add an image description and title right there word provides this PDF present provides this PowerPoint provides this action you just have to right click it and or eight there are several ways to access it but for the microsoft office products they’re almost all the same and then you know with website templates they’re usually in the insert/edit image area and so I’m you know think what does this image represent what is happening in the image if the image is purely decorative you may want to leave it empty or add an old alt text attribute which means that the screen readers will ignore the images for more complex images and graphics and charts on if the charts aren’t adequately described in the text on the page on you may want to convert them into accessible tables at minimum you should provide a title and caption so if the information the chart is not described in the chart provided description in summary it’s not necessary to describe visual characteristics like blue column yellow column and so for this as you can see i converted and with the space that I could this chart and the 2a accessible table and so the title of this chart is how people who are deaf hard of hearing blind or have low vision are alerted to emergencies and description would be the figure is a bar chart that has been converted into the following table all data are approximate now i’m sharing with this with you not so that you can go through all of your PDF content and change all the tables too accessible tables but it may be helpful in the event that someone requests a more accessible document or when you’re creating presentations or guidance documents and reports to make them accessible in these kinds of documents so that they’re available to your colleagues and peers for audio and video I you want to make sure that there’s captions and this is a screenshot of a from the movie bad teacher and as you can see it doesn’t make any sense of the original line by cameron diaz is from now on my full-time is finding a man who will take care of me but in the screenshot it says now on apartheid August 1992 campaign well that doesn’t make any sense and it’s you know someone with a hearing on hearing impairment and we’ll obviously not know what actually was just said and so barriers for audio/video other multimedia is a lack of or unintelligible closed captions and also insufficient description by text or audio which I will describe in a moment these are the ways that you can provide accessibility for audio and video either through transcripts captions audio description on interpreting transcript is just a textual version of the content presented within the multimedia it’s not synchronized with the video and it’s an acceptable format for podcast captions are you know text versions of the spoken word they are synchronized with the video and you know they match the timing of that the words match what is set on screen and this is best practice for video audio descriptions provide additional info Nation about what is visible on a screen so I’m a an audio description is a file that describes the video so this is how video this is how captioning works this picture on the screen you add a video file plus a captioning file into the video player haha there’s the caption with the video and the same thing would happen with an audio description you would add an audio description file and and and so this would be the best way for a person with a visual disability to truly understand what’s going on in the background some additional questions on that you may want to ask for this for this issue is the audio/video pre recorded or live now you want to consider accessibility for both if it is live in someone well maybe someone requested but you want to be prepared they may request a real-time captioning or cart and so you may want to at least have you no access to or work with a cart vendor to provide such a service in the event that you need one and so for situations like this you want to consider an accessibility statement when your marketing your events just like there was one for this webinar so for this webinar and they provided a statement that said if you anticipate a need for a disability related accommodation or auxiliary eight participate please contact blank at blank we ask that you provide us with at least three to five days of advance notice regarding your equal access needs so know if if you aren’t going to incorporate accessibility right away at least provide an auction up front you know so that you’re not scrambling to find interpreter or cart service PS i wanted to focus a little bit on pdfs because at least in my experience on and observations a lot of the data in the database content are pdfs and so these are some of the accessibility criteria for PDF accessibility so whether you’re creating or storing open educational resources scanning items for you reserve other document delivery or licensing with a publisher who’s database is filled with PDFs or even epubs you want to keep all these criteria in mind biggest barrier is a scanned image or an image-based PDF and most of you probably know what this looks like because when you have an image-based PDF you can highlight any of the text when you try to right click on the document it highlights the entire document with this means that a screen reader or a text-to-speech software wouldn’t be able to extract the texts and read it out loud which is an issue for people with print disabilities and so you know the goal is to have pdfs and ebooks that are text-based tag and structured appropriately and I’m and these are some additional elements that increase and enhance accessibility obviously in your environment there will be plenty of books with writing and highlighting and so you know something like an optical character recognition scan software may not be able to perfectly fix these scans and so in the event that you can perfectly fix these scans and there’s a request i may need to come up with a different way to provide this resource this could either be you know editing within an OCR software or retyping or having a volunteer reader in the library there are a number of ways to provide equal access and I mentioned OCR optical character recognition and these are just some examples of tools that I’ve seen people use or reviews myself and you know OCR is also built into scanners that you purchased for the library but they are proud probably not as powerful and effective as separate OCR software and so you’re you’re going to want to have additional OCR software unless you’re scanning your scanner is perfect please let me know because i have yet to find a scanner that has a perfect OCR and like very accurate conversion to an audio file kind of task so if you use microsoft word and you create an accessible word doc again you know using headings and alt text and stuff like that when you save it as a PDF the accessibility features will retain generally speaking the process of repairing PDF files is very time-consuming and imperfect my advice is to at minimum OCR scan and add tags this is a pretty simple two-step process that can be batched in a folder of documents overnight and if documents need additional cleanup you can wait until the accessibility request is submitted and and tagging i think i mentioned that i don’t know if i define daba tagging is a way to structure the reading order so you can have you know a magazine with four columns but if you don’t tag it properly the screen reader might read left to right across off or columns which obviously is not correct and so that’s why the reading order part is very important so I wanted to briefly show you I’m inaccessible vs in accessible PDF I’m just waiting for this to share my screen and okay so this isn’t an accessible PDF and as you can see when I click on it I can’t grab the text after scanning with adobe acrobat professional with the OCR process it is now text renderable and can be read out loud for the inaccessible and this is how you check how to read a PDF and adobe PDF was created by Adobe and so I’m they have a built-in a reading tool for text-to-speech so you go to view read out loud and activate read out loud now you won’t really be able to this through my computer but it it doesn’t really matter because it won’t even say anything at all because it’s not accessible and what it should say is like empty page or cannot read or something like this and if i come over to the accessible PDF it will read it perfectly now if I mean obviously this is a very clean scan and a pretty simple structured PDF so that’s good ok so I’m going to get out of that and just to show you how how that would impact someone using a screen reader that in accessible PDF i’d also like to show you this video of jaws which is a a probably the most popular screen reader reading an accessible PDF pause with the National Origins inaccessible 1+2 1+2 a cami did these 11 north and Congress my colon delivered norco living back to left-back celexa th can use so even if even when a scan looks pretty clean now it doesn’t really look clean on the screen but when i recorded it it looked like that out that other accessible PDF just because it’s clean does not mean that it’s accessible and so you really you really do need to check the readout loud feature to see if it’s intelligible just like unintelligible closed captions so now let’s move on to procurement and so if you don’t have a policy or process in place for accessible technology acquisitions this is something I very very highly recommend that you what we start or you know just continue to do and you may want to do this work via a committee I’m first you’re going to want to adopt accessibility standards by either the section 508 standards for the wick AG two point O double-a standards these have checklists and so you don’t really have to do as much additional work as it sounds like and you want to put this responsibility on the vendor i’ll explain so first of all advocating for successful solutions upfront will save you money and resources at fixing inaccessible content environments retrofitting technology after the fact is timely costly and ultimately inequitable we don’t want to rely on vendors to determine accessibility you want to put the responsibility on the vendor for providing proof however there is no certification for accessibility so if a vendor tells you they’re a dar 508 compliant you should question what that means and this is how this is why we need to verify documentation and support because they will say they are and oftentimes they’re not not fully anyway maybe maybe one review aspects of their service or technology is accessible but there are other really important features that may not be so you may want to have them fill out one of these checklist at what most people use is of the pad or a voluntary product accessibility template the v pad is it is a standard checklist for section 508 it’s a voluntary non-binding evaluation tool that many institutions and federal entities use in order to you know verify documentation and support and I mean you can have them fill out this checklist or you could in any or you could review it yourself you could test it yourself testing the product or service i have some organizations like I said have a committee for accessible purchasing and they assess the products and make the decisions this is a lot of work and you may not have the resources or expertise to do this i recommend urging the vendor to go to a third-party accessibility evaluator or consultant just say look these are the standards we have here’s here’s the veep at I here are some vendors that you are here are some consultants that you can use come back to us with and you know the strengths and limitations of your product and then go from there fortunately there’s been a much greater awareness of the accessibility with our partners our industrial partners but i encourage you to work closely with them because some of them some of them may be smaller and less familiar with accessibility criteria work with them on accomplishing milestones put accessibility on their roadmap if there are products and services that meet your business needs that are not fully accessible and there will be there should be a process in place to provide an equally effective alternative or an alternative access plan on CSU the California State University system has a fantastic template for an equally effective alternative access plan I i highly recommend you use that and i will provide that resource to you the good thing about following an accessibility review processes that you will know about the gaps to access up front like I said nothing will be a hundred percent accessible but we need to be prepared to provide access in the event that student or a person cannot access the product or solution so and here is some sample license language taken from the report on the Association research libraries task force to serve patrons with print disabilities many libraries have adopted this kind of license language and if the products are not 100-percent accessible put a timeline in the in the contract that says you know these features will be accessible in X amount of months X amount of years whatever because you know it’s really important and it also they should want to do this because it will make their product better so some of the challenges that come along with all of this and i’ll start with acquisitions since we were just talking about it I because you know libraries are increasingly acquiring digital resources through licenses there’s there’s a little competition very large packages and it’s not all the same content it’s not all the same publisher and vendors and publishers will provide content and interfaces that are not accessible even when they say so you may experience pushback from the vendor’s but the legal responsibility to provide access to our patrons lies on us not them so and we really need to push them because it’s not them who are getting lawsuits it’s us not what products and services will be a hundred percent successful therefore you need to make a risk assessment based on the impact this product and service will have in the community think about who the intended audiences what is the impact if it’s a product at an academic library for example that directly impact student success that’s a high-impact product and you will want to follow an accessibility review process bottom line is purchased the most accessible product that meets your business needs and document everything another challenge is system synergy just making sure all our technical systems work together fluidly stronger metadata I know this kind of buzz word in library worlds and you know needing to make things more easily findable and as far as accessibility is concerned be ideal if the metadata included I’m you know taita words like captions so that patrons are easily i’m able to locate these kinds of information time and so on this is mostly in regards to academic libraries and I Disability Services offices traditionally have been seen as the primary responsible office for providing access to students who self-identify with the institution this isn’t really the case anymore it actually wasn’t really ever the case but that just you know is how it was interpreted with the increase in technologies and need for electronic resources libraries need to partner with disability services and IT and purchasing in order to provide accessible materials to the campus community which means this might eat and this will require some time and planning in ensuring um and continuing accessibility initiatives at the library’s cost it you know money is tight for a lot of people I’m not everyone can afford a library accessibility position or hiring a third party consultant to comment and you know audit all their services or even the newest OCR software and but there are plenty of other libraries that are working to be more inclusive and accessible and so you know just collaborating with other institutions seeing you know can I see your five-year plan on what is your licensing language I what does this position look like at your library what did they do how is it improved your services on regarding technologies and tools and there are plenty of built-in or free and low-cost tools that create and check accessibility of websites of pdfs and other kinds of content so I’m curious because i haven’t seen anyone chat yet and what other challenges can you think of or have experienced yourself relevant to this topic and you can answer in the chat I want to see if I missed anything would be good for discussion ok database accessibility is not perfect as perfect as it could be okay well you gotta start somewhere and you know maybe maybe you don’t know what’s inaccessible and maybe this is the first time you’re learning about this assessment is definitely the first step does your organization address accessibility period know you want to evaluate your policies and procedures your existing process of products and services from websites to document delivery you may want to set a policy or statement of commitment to your dedication and commitment to ensuring access for all this is a sample statement from the michigan state universities libraries and keep it on that long i’m sorry it’s basically just says that the msu libraries is committed to providing equal access to their patrons and that when things aren’t accessible that they are committed to providing accommodations in a timely manner and so to continue on that I’m you know assessment you may wish to create a timeline to improve access of your current processes in technology is this would include you know some kind of audit or testing basically you want to gauge your accessibility triggers accessibility triggers factors of these maybe you know utilization by entire department entire population or public-facing information and you want to prioritize this by factors such as high-interest most assess largest vendors essential miss of resource I’m i believe the biggest impact is websites and then procurement if you don’t already for remediating develop a plan to respond to requests for effective communication such as captioning or interpreters for print materials as well as other kinds of requests for accommodations on the library webpages provide a mechanism to report accessibility feedback and then training I think it’s really important for everyone to at least have a basic understanding of accessibility even if even if not everyone knows how to I you know remediate content or right include language within the contracts everyone should know at least you know the what is available and what can be done immediately and and so on and so like you know that just means accessibility requires cooperative oversight so these are just a few ways that you can be proactive and the listservs that are mentioned the dishy Athen ahead those are all I’m higher education listservs i’m i’m honestly not very familiar with the pop public library listserv so if anyone is from that area that could provide on resources or information that would be wonderful you’re going to want to create partnerships with key stakeholders on campus and the community like I said I t disability services the purchasing department academic technologies physical facilities and so on you may want to create if you don’t have one already and accessibility committee there could be a campus-wide accessibility committee have you know a representative from the library on this committee or you and I i would recommend you know having a library accessibility committee on that over that reviews assesses all of the items we discussed today collaborate across institutions budget for accessibility this is really important because oftentimes I here and this is not a library problem alone per se but people on planet events and they don’t watch it for accessibility they don’t budget for meeting interpreters or I’m you know remediating content and so you want to keep this in mind as you’re setting up budgets for events cost-sharing accessibility and states and districts could explore opportunities to procure accessible technology devices digital materials or online learning opportunities you could develop a web page for library services for individuals with disabilities these are just a few libraries on the have done this and you know these libraries provide either a statement or policy or specifics about the services that they provide with document delivery and interlibrary loans and what kinds of assistive technologies are available and so you know look to some of these institutions as a model for providing information up front just to individuals and you could go the extra mile I don’t even really consider this an extra mile but i suppose it might it might be seen as some as an extra mile but is there someone responsible for accessibility in your library on all these libraries listed have designated a single person as responsible for coordinating the accessibility of the libraries and and so if you if if that is challenging for some I’m you consider putting accessibility into job descriptions or you know using a committee to you know determine roles and responsibilities I’ve learned from the past webinar by George Mason University which is listed on the slide they’re coordinator serves as a liaison between the assistive technology department and the library staff and this has led to improve coordination an informal process for accessible acquisitions assistive technology testing for popular library databases and some other things and so you know reach out to these people and see what’s in their job description what are they doing and so on and here’s bottom line and takeaways basically just build accessibility into your workflow and accessibility already lines with library values and but you know with the with the increase in the digital world and the physical world together we need to really be proactive in ensuring accessibility from the beginning of design and purchasing and so on have a process in place to address accessibility and inaccessible content products and services remember and and know that many institutions are both proactive and reactive and so you can be reactive but if you haven’t planned ahead you have to be able to quickly provide meaningful timely and equivalent access accessibility is an ongoing process it’s not a checkbox you cannot fix everything at once it’s impossible just try to find a middle ground and continue to improve your processes think of it as and instead of thinking about this as compliance try to think of it as conformance you gotta start somewhere and doing something is better than nothing and you know with the complexity and size of some of the content and databases and and everything that you all manage and organize just just begin you know begin with websites and go to procurement and and and try to work work your way down into constant audit test review evaluation kind of process and always provide a way for someone to provide feedback that being said I wanted to end within the hour so that we could have some time for questions and discussion and I see one that says can you specify all the ways that readers now need to be accessible when you say e-reader Rita do you mean I’m like the e-reader physical ereader or um ereader apps or and physically readers we have candles ok so the earliest Kindles are are definitely not accessible but i do believe that once there was there was a there was another settlement against educational organization that I think it was a college that handed out candles to all of their incoming freshmen and that was a serious issue and there was a dear colleague letter on the kindle and I’m so basically what needs to happen is the physical ereader needs to have screen reader or text to speech capability by someone who is visually impaired especially so when you use something like an iPhone or an iPad there is accessibility built into that product specifically voiceover voiceover is the screen reader software built into apple products and what that enables people with visual impairments to do is navigate through the apps on you know be able to call people be able to read everything on Safari and stuff like that and the candles didn’t have that built-in I’m so you know you might want to investigate the settings of it and just see if um let’s see if that is even an option because that wasn’t an option on earlier versions i don’t know if it is now but that’s a way to see you know if it’s more accessible for the apps and so screen readers screen readers are built in to your computers and devices for the most part if you’re using an Apple device like I said it’s voiceover if you’re using a Windows device on there’s a built-in screen reader but it’s not really that good so most people use what’s called NVDA which is a free screen reader and other other screen readers include like jaws and window-eyes those are very popular ones so I’m the only way to test accessibility within something like a physical ereader is if it if the screen reader is built into it and whether you can navigate the whole thing without seeing it has to read the buttons and content out loud to you I would look up the manual and just see if that’s an option if you can’t find it yourself anyone else have any any questions or comments or discussion it doesn’t really look like it so I’m thank you and I have so many resources to provide and you can access on you can access me at any time so you’re some accessibility once here are some legal and technical resources and here’s my contact information and that is my direct line so if you want to you know call please feel free to but I i think you for your attendance and I really hope that I’ve been able to provide you with some information that you can take and apply in real-life situations announced thank you so much as a great webinar I just want to let everyone know I’m putting a link to an evaluation in the chat there i’m and i will probably be online for another minute or two if anyone thinks of anything last minute that you didn’t think of before and this recording will be available on our website singing along with documentation and notes from the presentation alright thank you yes thank you we really appreciate having you today and I’m and thank you to everyone else that is Ellen for producing this webinar today Steve yes we will be something we are the web address to everyone who registered will be sending it to the email address that you registered okay i’m going to end the recording now

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